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Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, March 13 Kyodo

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Japan, Saudi Arabia vow to explore special economic zones

TOKYO - Japan and Saudi Arabia agreed Monday to explore setting
up special economic zones to invite more investment by Japanese
companies into the Middle East country, as part of a plan to help
both countries reach their economic growth goals through reforms.
The "Saudi-Japan Vision 2030" plan was announced after a summit
in Tokyo between Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and King Salman bin
Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia.
----------
Keidanren, labor body Rengo agree to introduce 100-hour overtime cap

TOKYO - Japan's most powerful business lobby Keidanren and the
pan labor union Rengo agreed Monday to limit monthly overtime work to
100 hours during busy periods as the country seeks to change its
deep-rooted culture of working long hours.
The agreement is a step toward broader labor reform under Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe. But the 100-hour cap is still said to be a level
that can cause serious health consequences.
----------
Park abandons 9 dogs at presidential residence: animal welfare group

SEOUL - When South Korea's ousted leader Park Gyen Hye left the
presidential residence on Sunday, two days after her impeachment was
upheld by the Constitutional Court, she left behind nine pet dogs,
leading an animal welfare group to accuse her of abandonment.
The Seoul-based group, called Coexistence of Animal Rights on
Earth, in a statement on social media, accused Park of
irresponsibility for adopting a pair of Jindo dogs, a Korean breed
known for loyalty and devotion, allowing them to breed and then
effectively abandoning them.
----------
China says 61 people died of bird flu in February

BEIJING - Chinese health authorities said Monday that 61 people
died of bird flu infection in February, bringing the total number of
fatalities for this year to 140.
The National Health and Family Planning Commission reported 161
cases of human infection from the deadly H7N9 avian flu virus last
month. The total number of those infected in 2017 increased to 352.
----------
Malaysia nabs 5 Filipinos, 2 locals for suspected IS links

KUALA LUMPUR - Malaysian police said Monday that five Filipinos
and two Malaysians including an immigration officer have been
arrested for suspected ties to the Islamic State terror group.
The swoop by the Special Branch Counter-Terror Division of the
police in an operation that started last Wednesday was connected to
an IS cell in the southern Philippines.
----------
H.K. chief Leung elected to China's political advisory body

HONG KONG - Hong Kong's outgoing leader Leung Chun-ying was on
Monday elected a vice chairman of China's top political advisory
body, becoming the first chief executive to hold the two offices
concurrently.
The majority of some 2,100 delegates of the Chinese People's
Political Consultative Conference voted for Leung's endorsement in
the closing ceremony of the group's annual session held in Beijing.
----------
Toshiba to push back release of earnings again: sources

TOKYO - Toshiba Corp. will once again push back the release of
its financial results after missing the initial deadline a month ago
to probe a potential auditing problem at its U.S. nuclear unit
Westinghouse Electric Co., sources close to the matter said Monday.
The Japanese conglomerate has told its main creditors it is
unable to finalize the numbers by the March 14 deadline, as it is now
considering Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for Westinghouse, the
sources said.
----------
Malaysia, N. Korea in talks over Malaysians affected by exit ban

KUALA LUMPUR - Malaysia is holding talks with North Korea for
the return of nine citizens stranded in North Korea amid a diplomatic
spat linked to the murder of the estranged half-brother of North
Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi
said Monday.
"The negotiations with North Korea are now going on...the
priority now should be on the safety of the nine Malaysians," he told
reporters, referring to the citizens who are stranded in North Korea
under an exit ban imposed on them.
----------
Japan, U.S. hold joint military drill with Osprey fleet

NIIGATA, Japan - Four U.S. Marine Corps Osprey transport
aircraft were used Monday in an ongoing joint military exercise
between Japan and the United States in Niigata, making it the
largest-ever fleet of the tilt-rotor aircraft to take part in a joint
drill in Japan.
Up to six MV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft from a Marine Corps base in
Okinawa are scheduled to participate in the drill which started with
about 750 troops at the Ground Self-Defense Force's Camp Somagahara
in Gunma Prefecture, eastern Japan, on March 6 and will continue
through Friday at the Sekiyama training area.
----------
Defense minister grilled over link to scandal-hit school operator

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Cabinet continued to be
grilled Monday over the cut-price sale of public land to a school
operator, with the opposition focusing on a suspected link between
the defense minister and the troubled operator.
Toshio Ogawa of the main opposition Democratic Party said
Defense Minister Tomomi Inada and her husband were named as legal
counsel for the school operator Moritomo Gakuen in a document
prepared for a civil lawsuit involving the operator, dated Oct. 11,
2005.
----------
Dollar hovers in upper 114 yen ahead of Fed meeting

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered narrowly in the upper 114 yen
level Monday in Tokyo as traders refrained from making bold bets
ahead of policy meetings of the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan
later this week.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 114.67-68 yen compared with
114.79-89 yen in New York and 115.40-41 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Friday. It moved between 114.51 yen and 114.92 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 114.85 yen.
----------
Japan's key bond yield ends flat amid wait-and-see mood

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond ended flat Monday as investors largely sat on the sidelines
ahead of the U.S. Federal Open Market Committee meeting and other key
events scheduled this week.
The yield on the No. 346, 0.1 percent issue, the main yardstick
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at 0.085
percent, unchanged from Friday's close.


Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, March 13 Kyodo

----------
Japan, U.S. hold joint military drill with Osprey fleet

NIIGATA, Japan - Four U.S. Marine Corps Osprey transport
aircraft were used Monday in an ongoing joint military exercise
between Japan and the United States in Niigata, making it the
largest-ever fleet of the tilt-rotor aircraft to take part in a joint
drill in Japan.
Up to six MV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft from a Marine Corps base in
Okinawa are scheduled to participate in the drill which started with
about 750 troops at the Ground Self-Defense Force's Camp Somagahara
in Gunma Prefecture, eastern Japan, on March 6 and will continue
through Friday at the Sekiyama training area.
----------
Japan PM, Saudi king to reach deal on special economic zones: sources

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and King Salman bin Abdulaziz
of Saudi Arabia plan to agree Monday to set up special economic zones
in the Middle East country, to the benefit of major Japanese
companies, according to Japanese government sources.
The move will be part of a bilateral plan to help Saudi Arabia,
Japan's top crude oil supplier, fulfill its "Saudi Vision 2030"
growth strategy. The two leaders began their meeting at the prime
minister's office on Monday evening.
----------
Defense minister grilled over link to scandal-hit school operator

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Cabinet continued to be
grilled Monday over the cut-price sale of public land to a school
operator, with the opposition focusing on a suspected link between
the defense minister and the troubled operator.
Toshio Ogawa of the main opposition Democratic Party said
Defense Minister Tomomi Inada and her husband were named as legal
counsel for the school operator Moritomo Gakuen in a document
prepared for a civil lawsuit involving the operator, dated Oct. 11,
2005.
----------
H.K. chief Leung elected to China's political advisory body

HONG KONG - Hong Kong's outgoing leader Leung Chun-ying was on
Monday elected a vice chairman of China's top political advisory body.
The majority of some 2,100 delegates of the Chinese People's
Political Consultative Conference voted for Leung's endorsement in
the closing ceremony of the group's annual session held in Beijing.
----------
Dollar hovers in upper 114 yen ahead of Fed meeting

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered narrowly in the upper 114 yen
level Monday in Tokyo as traders refrained from making bold bets
ahead of policy meetings of the Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan
later this week.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 114.67-68 yen compared with
114.79-89 yen in New York and 115.40-41 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Friday. It moved between 114.51 yen and 114.92 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 114.85 yen.
----------
Japan's key bond yield ends flat amid wait-and-see mood

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond ended flat Monday as investors largely sat on the sidelines
ahead of the U.S. Federal Open Market Committee meeting and other key
events scheduled this week.
The yield on the No. 346, 0.1 percent issue, the main yardstick
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at 0.085
percent, unchanged from Friday's close.
----------
Tokyo stocks gain on U.S. optimism, caution prevails ahead of FOMC

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks ended higher Monday on buying stoked by
strong U.S. jobs data, but gains were limited in cautious trading
ahead of the U.S. Federal Open Market Committee meeting later this
week.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 29.14 points, or
0.15 percent, from Friday at 19,633.75. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 3.39
points, or 0.22 percent, higher at 1,577.40.
----------
Senior aides to S. Korea's impeached leader Park offer to resign

SEOUL - Senior aides to South Korea's ousted President Park Geun
Hye, who departed the presidential office over the weekend, on Monday
submitted their resignations en masse to the country's acting leader,
a government official said.
Presidential Chief of Staff Han Gwang Ok and nine other
presidential secretaries tendered their resignations to acting
President and Prime Minister Hwang Kyo Ahn, the official said.
----------
Austrian, Japanese choirs sing in support of quake-rebuilding

VIENNA - Some 300 members of choirs from Japan and Austria sang
Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" in Vienna on Sunday in support of rebuilding
efforts in areas of northeastern Japan devastated by the 2011
earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disasters.
The concert, the fourth of its kind held one day after the sixth
anniversary of the disasters, also drew members of the Vienna Boys
Choir. The Symphony No. 9 was played by the Wiener Chamber Orchestra.
----------
Plagiarism suspected in up to 21,000 DeNA online articles

TOKYO - As many as 21,000 articles that had been posted on
now-shuttered online information sites run by DeNA Co. are suspected
to have violated copyrights, an investigative panel said Monday.
The Internet service company has closed down all of its 10
online information sites carrying over 370,000 articles after some of
the articles were accused of being plagiarized and inaccurate.
----------
Luxury liner Queen Elizabeth to start cruise from Japan for 1st time

KOBE - The luxury cruise ship Queen Elizabeth arrived at Kobe
port in western Japan on Monday ahead of its first cruise departing
from and returning to Japan.
The eight-day voyage from Kobe through March 20 comes after the
municipal government of Kobe asked the Cunard Line, the ship's
British operator, to organize a Kobe-originating tour as it
celebrates the 150th anniversary this year of the port's opening.
----------
Gov't agency to open website to help judge whether to call ambulance

TOKYO - A Japanese government agency plans to launch a website
this month to help people judge whether they need to call an
ambulance in a bid to deal with a growing number of such calls,
including some that are not urgent.
The website, developed by the Fire and Disaster Management
Agency also in charge of ambulance services, requires users to answer
questions about the condition of patients such as whether they are
responding to calls or can speak. If symptoms deemed urgent are
clicked, messages pop up advising them to call an ambulance
immediately.

Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, March 13 Kyodo

----------
Senior aides to S. Korea's impeached leader Park offer to resign

SEOUL - Senior aides to South Korea's ousted President Park Geun
Hye, who departed the presidential office over the weekend, on Monday
submitted their resignations en masse to the country's acting leader,
a government official said.
Presidential Chief of Staff Han Gwang Ok and nine other
presidential secretaries tendered their resignations to acting
President and Prime Minister Hwang Kyo Ahn, the official said.
----------
Austrian, Japanese choirs sing in support of quake-rebuilding

VIENNA - Some 300 members of choirs from Japan and Austria sang
Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" in Vienna on Sunday in support of rebuilding
efforts in areas of northeastern Japan devastated by the 2011
earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disasters.
The concert, the fourth of its kind held one day after the sixth
anniversary of the disasters, also drew members of the Vienna Boys
Choir. The Symphony No. 9 was played by the Wiener Chamber Orchestra.
----------
Tokyo stocks gain on U.S. optimism, caution prevails ahead of FOMC

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks ended slightly higher Monday, bought on
strong U.S. jobs data, though gains were limited in cautious trading
ahead of a Federal Open Market Committee meeting later in the week.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 29.14 points, or
0.15 percent, from Friday at 19,633.75. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 3.39
points, or 0.22 percent, higher at 1,577.40.
----------
Plagiarism suspected in up to 21,000 DeNA online articles

TOKYO - As many as 21,000 articles that had been posted on
now-shuttered online information sites run by DeNA Co. are suspected
to have violated copyrights, an investigative panel said Monday.
The Internet service company has closed down all of its 10
online information sites carrying over 370,000 articles after some of
the articles were accused of being plagiarized and inaccurate.
----------
Luxury liner Queen Elizabeth to start cruise from Japan for 1st time

KOBE - The luxury cruise ship Queen Elizabeth arrived at Kobe
port in western Japan on Monday ahead of its first cruise departing
from and returning to Japan.
The eight-day voyage from Kobe through March 20 comes after the
municipal government of Kobe asked the Cunard Line, the ship's
British operator, to organize a Kobe-originating tour as it
celebrates the 150th anniversary this year of the port's opening.
----------
Gov't agency to open website to help judge whether to call ambulance

TOKYO - A Japanese government agency plans to launch a website
this month to help people judge whether they need to call an
ambulance in a bid to deal with a growing number of such calls,
including some that are not urgent.
The website, developed by the Fire and Disaster Management
Agency also in charge of ambulance services, requires users to answer
questions about the condition of patients such as whether they are
responding to calls or can speak. If symptoms deemed urgent are
clicked, messages pop up advising them to call an ambulance
immediately.
----------
Japan PM, Saudi king to reach deal on special economic zones: sources

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and King Salman bin Abdulaziz
of Saudi Arabia plan to agree Monday to set up special economic zones
in the Middle East country, to the benefit of major Japanese
companies, according to Japanese government sources.
The move will be part of a bilateral plan, which the leaders are
expected to announce in their meeting Monday evening in Tokyo, to
help Saudi Arabia, Japan's top crude oil supplier, fulfill its "Saudi
Vision 2030" growth strategy.
----------
Japan's parcel firms to strengthen local delivery coordination

TOKYO - Yamato Transport Co. and two other major parcel delivery
companies plan to expand their cooperation, picking a single company
to deliver packages for the others within a building, condominium or
a region to cope with a workforce shortage, Yamato officials said
Monday.
Such coordination by Yamato, the largest door-to-door parcel
delivery provider, No. 2 player Sagawa Express Co. and No. 3 Japan
Post Co. is expected to allow efficient delivery of packages to
offices in skyscrapers and to condominium residents, they said.
----------
S. Korea, U.S. begin annual military exercise amid N. Korea tensions

SEOUL - South Korea and the United States began their annual
joint military exercise on Monday amid heightened tensions with North
Korea following its latest test-firing of ballistic missiles.
The two-week exercise, known as Key Resolve, comes after North
Korea on March 6 launched four ballistic missiles in Japan's
direction simultaneously in violation of U.N. Security Council
resolutions.
----------
Do-it-yourself robot "Robi" from Japan debuts in Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR - Robi, a Japanese-developed humanoid robot
assembled with parts supplied weekly, has made its debut in Malaysia,
touting its ability to communicate in English, Malay and Chinese.
"Robi is a fusion of sophisticated design and advanced Japanese
technology that was designed to provide interactive bonding
experiences for the entire family," said Hajime Murano, head of
DeAgostini Japan, its distributor, during a launching event in
Malaysia on Friday.
----------
Dollar hovers in upper 114 yen range ahead of Fed's policy meeting

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered narrowly in the upper 114 yen
zone Monday morning in Tokyo with many traders bracing for a widely
anticipated rate hike decision at the Federal Reserve policy meeting
this week and a possible change in the path of further rate increases
in 2017.
At noon, the dollar fetched 114.88-90 yen compared with
114.79-89 yen in New York and 115.40-41 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m. Friday.
----------
Japan's key bond yield flat in morning

TOKYO - The yield on the bellwether 10-year Japanese government
bond was flat Monday morning as investors refrained from making bold
moves ahead of key events this week including a U.S. Federal Open
Market Committee meeting.
The yield on the No. 346, 0.1 percent issue, the main yardstick
of long-term interest rates, ended morning interdealer trading at
0.085 percent, unchanged from Friday's close.

Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, March 13 Kyodo

----------
S. Korea, U.S. begin annual military exercise amid N. Korea tensions

SEOUL - South Korea and the United States began their annual
joint military exercise on Monday amid heightened tensions with North
Korea following its latest test-firing of ballistic missiles.
The two-week exercise, known as Key Resolve, comes after North
Korea on March 6 launched four ballistic missiles in Japan's
direction simultaneously in violation of U.N. Security Council
resolutions.
----------
Do-it-yourself robot "Robi" from Japan debuts in Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR - Robi, a Japanese-developed humanoid robot
assembled with parts supplied weekly, has made its debut in Malaysia,
touting its ability to communicate in English, Malay and Chinese.
"Robi is a fusion of sophisticated design and advanced Japanese
technology that was designed to provide interactive bonding
experiences for the entire family," said Hajime Murano, head of
DeAgostini Japan, its distributor, during a launching event in
Malaysia on Friday.
----------
Dollar hovers in upper 114 yen range ahead of Fed's policy meeting

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered narrowly in the upper 114 yen
zone Monday morning in Tokyo with many traders bracing for a widely
anticipated rate hike decision at the Federal Reserve policy meeting
this week and a possible change in the path of further rate increases
in 2017.
At noon, the dollar fetched 114.88-90 yen compared with
114.79-89 yen in New York and 115.40-41 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m. Friday.
----------
Tokyo stocks rise in morning on U.S. optimism after upbeat jobs data

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rose slightly Monday morning, with
investors encouraged by strong U.S. jobs data released before the
weekend that made it almost certain that the Federal Reserve will
raise interest rates later this week.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average rose 37.40 points, or 0.19
percent, from Friday to 19,642.01. The broader Topix index of all
First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 3.36 points,
or 0.21 percent, to 1,577.37.
----------
FEATURE: Japan reviewing flu measures amid fears of possible pandemic

TOKYO - Japanese government officials and scientists are seeking
to update measures to prepare for any influenza pandemic among humans
amid growing concerns following avian flu's global spread among birds
this winter.
Researchers plan to review the government's estimation of damage
to be caused by a possible flu pandemic as it was drawn up more than
a decade ago and does not reflect the nation's latest medical
situation.
----------
Japan's key bond yield flat in morning

TOKYO - The yield on the bellwether 10-year Japanese government
bond was flat Monday morning as investors refrained from making bold
moves ahead of key events this week including a U.S. Federal Open
Market Committee meeting.
The yield on the No. 346, 0.1 percent issue, the main yardstick
of long-term interest rates, ended morning interdealer trading at
0.085 percent, unchanged from Friday's close.
----------
Japan's Feb. wholesale prices up at fastest pace in over 2 years

TOKYO - Japan's wholesale prices rose at their fastest pace in
more than two years in February on higher oil prices, up 1.0 percent
from a year earlier, Bank of Japan data showed Monday.
The result bodes well for the central bank, which has been
trying to achieve a 2 percent inflation goal by implementing
aggressive monetary easing measures. Wholesale prices, which fell for
a second year in 2016, tend to affect consumer prices.
----------
Jan. core machinery orders down 3.2% on weak manufacturers

TOKYO - Japan's core private-sector machinery orders fell a
seasonally adjusted 3.2 percent in January from the previous month to
837.9 billion yen ($7.3 billion) on weakness among manufacturers, the
government said Monday.
The orders, which exclude those for ships and from utilities
because of their volatility, are widely viewed as an indicator of
future capital spending by companies. They fell following a
downwardly revised 2.1 percent rise in December, while market
participants had forecast a slight decline.
----------
Top Austrian diplomat seeks Japan involvement in nuke abolition talks

VIENNA - Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz has expressed
hope that Japan, the only country ever attacked with atomic bombs,
will join negotiations later this month on a treaty outlawing nuclear
weapons.
"Japan, as the world's sole atomic-bombed nation, has a moral
voice and can give an invaluable opinion on the issue of nuclear
disarmament," Kurz said in a written interview with Kyodo News ahead
of the first round of negotiations beginning in New York on March 27.
----------
Japan provided Kim Jong Nam fingerprints to Malaysia for murder probe

KUALA LUMPUR/MANILA - Japan provided Malaysia with fingerprint
data of the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for the
investigation into his apparent murder last month at Kuala Lumpur
International Airport, sources close to the matter said Sunday.
The data was obtained from Kim Jong Nam when the Japanese
government detained him back in 2001 at Narita international airport
outside Tokyo for trying to enter the country on a false passport. He
told Japanese authorities at the time that he wanted to visit Tokyo
Disneyland.
----------
Revised traffic law takes effect to bar elderly drivers with dementia

TOKYO - A revised road traffic law took effect Sunday requiring
elderly people to pass tougher dementia tests when renewing their
driver's license as Japan's quickly-aging society grapples with more
frequent traffic accidents involving drivers of advanced age.
Under the new rule, drivers aged 75 or older are obliged to see
a doctor if a mandatory cognitive function test they must sit every
three years as part of the license renewal process indicates they may
be suffering dementia.
----------
S. Korea's impeached Park leaves presidential office for last time

SEOUL - South Korea's ousted leader Park Geun Hye on Sunday
departed the Blue House presidential office for the last time and
also issued a defiant apology.
In a statement read by her former spokesman after arriving at
her home in southern Seoul, she apologized to the nation and vowed to
clarify the truth behind the corruption allegations that led to her
ouster, according to Yonhap News Agency.


Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, March 13 Kyodo

----------
Tokyo stocks open lower as yen's firmness hurts sentiment

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks opened slightly lower Monday as the yen's
appreciation against the U.S. dollar hurt investor sentiment,
dragging down export-related issues.
In the first 15 minutes of trading, the 225-issue Nikkei Stock
Average fell 22.33 points, or 0.11 percent, from Friday to 19,582.28.
The broader Topix index of all First Section issues on the Tokyo
Stock Exchange was down 0.90 points, or 0.06 percent, to 1,573.11.
----------
Dollar trades in upper 114 yen range in early Tokyo deals

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar traded in the upper 114 yen range early
Monday morning in Tokyo, almost unchanged from its levels on Friday
in New York.
At 9 a.m., the dollar fetched 114.76-77 yen compared with
114.79-89 yen in New York and 115.40-41 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m. Friday.
----------
Japan's Jan. core machinery orders down 3.2% on month

TOKYO - Japan's core private-sector machinery orders fell a
seasonally adjusted 3.2 percent in January from the previous month to
837.9 billion yen ($7.3 billion), the government said Monday.
The orders, which exclude those for ships and from utilities
because of their volatility, are widely viewed as an indicator of
future capital spending by companies.
----------
Top Austrian diplomat seeks Japan involvement in nuke abolition talks

VIENNA - Austrian Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz has expressed
hope that Japan, the only country ever attacked with atomic bombs,
will join negotiations later this month on a treaty outlawing nuclear
weapons.
"Japan, as the world's sole atomic-bombed nation, has a moral
voice and can give an invaluable opinion on the issue of nuclear
disarmament," Kurz said in a written interview with Kyodo News ahead
of the first round of negotiations beginning in New York on March 27.
----------
Japan provided Kim Jong Nam fingerprints to Malaysia for murder probe

KUALA LUMPUR/MANILA - Japan provided Malaysia with fingerprint
data of the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for the
investigation into his apparent murder last month at Kuala Lumpur
International Airport, sources close to the matter said Sunday.
The data was obtained from Kim Jong Nam when the Japanese
government detained him back in 2001 at Narita international airport
outside Tokyo for trying to enter the country on a false passport. He
told Japanese authorities at the time that he wanted to visit Tokyo
Disneyland.
----------
Revised traffic law takes effect to bar elderly drivers with dementia

TOKYO - A revised road traffic law took effect Sunday requiring
elderly people to pass tougher dementia tests when renewing their
driver's license as Japan's quickly-aging society grapples with more
frequent traffic accidents involving drivers of advanced age.
Under the new rule, drivers aged 75 or older are obliged to see
a doctor if a mandatory cognitive function test they must sit every
three years as part of the license renewal process indicates they may
be suffering dementia.
----------
S. Korea's impeached Park leaves presidential office for last time

SEOUL - South Korea's ousted leader Park Geun Hye on Sunday
departed the Blue House presidential office for the last time and
also issued a defiant apology.
In a statement read by her former spokesman after arriving at
her home in southern Seoul, she apologized to the nation and vowed to
clarify the truth behind the corruption allegations that led to her
ouster, according to Yonhap News Agency.
----------
Saudi king begins 4-day Japan visit with mammoth delegation

TOKYO - King Salman bin Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia and his large
delegation began a four-day Japan visit Sunday, marking the first
trip to the country by a Saudi king in 46 years.
The Saudi king is scheduled to meet with Japanese Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe and have a lunch with Emperor Akihito during his stay in
Japan, according to the Japanese Foreign Ministry.
----------
H.K. leadership race hopefuls face off in first meet-up

HONG KONG - The three candidates in Hong Kong's leadership
election traded barbs in their first debate Sunday over education and
political issues.
The meet-up, held by the pro-democracy Professional Teachers'
Union, marked the first time for the contenders -- former Financial
Secretary John Tsang, former Chief Secretary Carrie Lam, and former
judge Woo Kwok-hing -- to appear together on stage.
----------
Abe vows to work toward lifting all evacuation orders in Fukushima

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pledged Sunday to continue
working until all evacuation orders in nuclear disaster-hit Fukushima
Prefecture are lifted.
Visiting Iwate, one of the three northeastern Japan prefectures
hit hardest by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, a day after the sixth
anniversary of the disaster, Abe told reporters, "No matter how long
it takes, we will tackle the matter with the aim of completely
lifting (evacuation orders)."
----------
Abe Cabinet's support rate down amid scandal over cut-price land deal

TOKYO - The support rate for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Cabinet
dropped 6.0 percentage points from the previous month to 55.7 percent
in a Kyodo News poll released Sunday, reflecting widespread
discontent with a scandal over the cut-price sale of public land to a
school operator with ties to the premier's wife.
The nationwide telephone survey conducted over the weekend
showed 86.5 percent of respondents said they see Moritomo Gakuen's
purchase of a state-owned land in western Japan at a heavily reduced
price as inappropriate, while 6.6 percent said they view it as
appropriate.
----------
Elephant kills handler in western Japan amusement facility

WAKAYAMA, Japan - An animal handler died Sunday after being
hurled against an iron fence by an elephant at an amusement facility
complex in western Japan, police said.
Thai national Wichai Madee and another handler were washing the
animal in a cage at Adventure World in Shirahama, Wakayama
Prefecture, when the elephant suddenly stood up, according to the
police.