Back to Main
Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, May 13 Kyodo

99 countries targeted in global ransomware cyberattack

LONDON - A massive cyberattack has hit 99 countries, including
many in Europe and Asia, with the public health system in Britain
severely disrupted Friday, according to cybersecurity firms.
A total of 75,000 attacks have been detected worldwide involving
the use of ransomware, a type of malware that encrypts computer files
and makes them inaccessible until the user pays a ransom.
----------
Ancient Japanese tomb mural with restored beauty open to the public

KASHIHARA, Japan - Tourists and history buffs on Saturday
flocked to the village of Asuka in Nara Prefecture for a glimpse of a
mural from an ancient tomb, which is on display through Friday.
The "Asuka Bijin" (Asuka beauties), a richly colored depiction
of beautiful women, is undergoing the final stage of restoration to
remove black stains caused by mold.
----------
N. Korea, S. Korea officials may have rare contact in Beijing

BEIJING - North and South Korean delegations respectively
arrived Saturday in Beijing to take part in an international
conference on China's ambitious plan to build modern-day overland and
maritime Silk Route trade routes.
The Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation starting
Sunday could provide a rare opportunity for both sides to come into
contact for the first time since South Korea's administration of
newly elected President Moon Jae In was formed on Wednesday.
----------
9 road construction workers gunned down in Pakistan

ISLAMABAD - Nine workers on a road construction project in
southwestern Pakistan were shot dead by unidentified attackers
Saturday morning, official sources said.
The workers were killed at two construction sites of a road in
Gwadar district of restive Balochistan province, the sources said.
----------
G-7 vows increased steps against cyberattacks, mum on protectionism

BARI, Italy - Finance chiefs from the Group of Seven
industrialized nations agreed to strengthen measures against
cyberattacks as they wrapped up a two-day meeting Saturday, saying
the threat to the global economy is increasing.
But despite fear of restrictive trade practices under the
administration of U.S. President Donald Trump, the G-7 statement,
issued after a meeting in southern Italy, skipped any explicit
wording on protectionism, as did the finance chief's statement of the
Group of 20 economies at their gathering in March.
----------
Gov't mulls banning entry of gambling addicts to pachinko parlors

TOKYO - The government and ruling parties plan to introduce a
system enabling pachinko parlors and other gambling facilities to ban
the entry of people with serious addiction, government sources said
Saturday.
Tackling gambling addiction has drawn renewed attention in Japan
as the country has lifted a ban on casinos under legislation that
took effect last year. The government believes building resorts with
casinos and hotels will lure tourists and benefit local economies.
----------
China-led infrastructure investment bank approves 7 more new members

BEIJING - The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank said Saturday
it has approved seven new members, including Bahrain, Chile and
Greece, to join the China-led institution.
The approval to expand its membership to 77 was announced a day
before China opens a two-day international forum in Beijing to
promote President Xi Jinping's grandiose initiative to build a vast
infrastructure network in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa.
----------
Senior N. Korean diplomat says open to dialogue with U.S., S. Korea

BEIJING - North Korea does not rule out dialogue with the United
States and South Korea, a senior diplomat suggested Saturday, while
mixed messages are emanating from those three countries on future
approaches to Pyongyang's nuclear weapons program.
"If conditions are met, we will hold dialogue (with
Washington)," Choe Son Hui, head of its Foreign Ministry's North
America bureau," told reporters in Beijing before heading back to
Pyongyang, following recent informal discussions with U.S. experts in
Norway.
----------
ILO chief emphasizes need to maintain momentum for work style reform

TOKYO - Work style reform being promoted by Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe is an important step but the real challenge is to maintain
momentum over the longer term, the chief of the International Labor
Organization said Saturday.
Guy Ryder, director general of the ILO, welcomed the Japanese
government's push to address excessive overtime, with Abe seeking to
impose a binding cap and ensure there is no discrimination between
regular and nonregular workers.
----------
Fire breaks out in amusement park in Saitama, no injuries

SAITAMA, Japan - A fire broke out late Friday night at Seibuen
amusement park in Saitama Prefecture neighboring Tokyo, but no one
was injured, police said Saturday.
The fire, which started around 11:30 p.m., appeared to have
consumed around 1,000 square meters before being extinguished about
two hours later. The park in the city of Tokorozawa will be closed
for a while until safety is secured.
----------
Rainy season starts in Japan's Okinawa, Amami

TOKYO - The rainy season appears to have started in the regions
of Okinawa and Amami in southwestern Japan, the weather agency said
Saturday.
This is four days later than average for Okinawa and two days
later for Amami in Kagoshima Prefecture, but three days earlier than
last year for both regions, according to the Japan Meteorological
Agency.
----------
U.N. panel calls for revising Japan-S. Korea "comfort women" deal

GENEVA - The U.N. Committee against Torture called on Japan and
South Korea to revise their 2015 deal to settle the long-standing row
over women who were forced into wartime Japanese military brothels.
The agreement should be modified to "ensure that the surviving
victims of sexual slavery during World War II are provided with
redress, including the right to compensation and rehabilitation and
the right to truth, reparation and assurances of non-repetitions,"
the committee said in a report.

Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, May 13 Kyodo

----------
G-7 to vow to fight inequality for sustained growth

BARI, Italy - Finance chiefs from the Group of Seven
industrialized nations are set to wrap up a two-day meeting Saturday
pledging to fight inequality as part of an effort to foster
sustainable economic growth.
In a statement to be issued after talks in Bari, southern Italy,
the G-7 are also expected to express their commitment to combating
the rising threat of cyberattacks, according to G-7 negotiation
sources. The seriousness of the threat was driven home by a global
cyberattack on Friday that infected tens of thousands of computers in
some 100 countries.
----------
Senior N. Korean diplomat says open to dialogue with U.S., S. Korea

BEIJING - North Korea does not rule out dialogue with the United
States and South Korea, a senior diplomat suggested Saturday, while
mixed messages are emanating from those three countries on future
approaches to Pyongyang's nuclear weapons program.
"If conditions are met, we will hold dialogue (with
Washington)," Choe Son Hui, head of its Foreign Ministry's North
America bureau," told reporters in Beijing before heading back to
Pyongyang, following recent informal discussions with U.S. experts in
Norway.
----------
ILO chief emphasizes need to maintain momentum for work style reform

TOKYO - Work style reform being promoted by Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe is an important step but the real challenge is to maintain
momentum over the longer term, the chief of the International Labor
Organization said Saturday.
Guy Ryder, director general of the ILO, welcomed the Japanese
government's push to address excessive overtime, with Abe seeking to
impose a binding cap and ensure there is no discrimination between
regular and nonregular workers.
----------
Fire breaks out in amusement park in Saitama, no injuries

SAITAMA, Japan - A fire broke out late Friday night at Seibuen
amusement park in Saitama Prefecture neighboring Tokyo, but no one
was injured, police said Saturday.
The fire, which started around 11:30 p.m., appeared to have
consumed around 1,000 square meters before being extinguished about
two hours later. The park in the city of Tokorozawa will be closed
for a while until safety is secured.
----------
Rainy season starts in Japan's Okinawa, Amami

TOKYO - The rainy season appears to have started in the regions
of Okinawa and Amami in southwestern Japan, the weather agency said
Saturday.
This is four days later than average for Okinawa and two days
later for Amami in Kagoshima Prefecture, but three days earlier than
last year for both regions, according to the Japan Meteorological
Agency.
----------
99 countries targeted in global cyberattack

LONDON - Cyberattacks have hit 99 countries, including many in
Europe and Asia, with the public health system in Britain severely
disrupted, U.S. and other media reported Friday.
A total of 75,000 attacks have reportedly been detected
worldwide involving the use of ransomware, a type of malware that
encrypts computer files and makes them inaccessible until the user
pays a ransom.
----------
Japanese researcher shows future of EVs with new wireless technology

KASHIWA, Japan - Electric vehicles, although meant to be the
wave of the future at a time when climate change has become a serious
issue, face a major hurdle: getting them to travel as far as, or even
surpass, fossil-fuel vehicles on a single charge.
To overcome this hurdle, a research group at the University of
Tokyo has been developing a wireless technology that relies on
in-wheel motors to receive a charge while driving on a charging lane
or section of roads embedded with power transmission coils. That, the
group says, will allow EVs to get more distance without heavily
relying on large-capacity batteries.
----------
U.N. panel calls for revising Japan-S. Korea "comfort women" deal

GENEVA - The U.N. Committee against Torture called on Japan and
South Korea to revise their 2015 deal to settle the long-standing row
over women who were forced into wartime Japanese military brothels.
The agreement should be modified to "ensure that the surviving
victims of sexual slavery during World War II are provided with
redress, including the right to compensation and rehabilitation and
the right to truth, reparation and assurances of non-repetitions,"
the committee said in a report.
----------
N. Korea urges U.N. members to reconsider sanctions

NEW YORK - North Korea's permanent mission to the United Nations
on Friday pressed all U.N. member countries to reconsider
implementing sanctions on the nuclear-armed country.
The move came as the U.N. Security Council's panel of experts on
North Korean sanctions steps up efforts to have all members fully
enforce the measures.
----------
Changing mindsets key for pushing women's leadership: confab chief

TOKYO - Changing the cultural mindset entrenched in Japanese
society that underestimates and undervalues women's abilities is not
only key to promoting them to leadership positions, it will also lead
to wider social and financial gains for all.
So said Irene Natividad, president of the Global Summit of
Women, in a recent interview ahead of the group's annual summit which
drew to Tokyo more than 1,300 business and political leaders from
over 60 countries.
----------
Bathhouse reformed as library showcasing 20,000 used comic books

GIFU, Japan - A small comic book library set up over 20 years
ago in a mountainous area of central Japan has proven to be a popular
embodiment of the spirit of recycling, as well as of people's love
for comics.
The building, formerly a public bathhouse run by Gifu city that
used to operate using heat generated by a nearby waste incineration
plant, houses around 20,000 used comic books kept on shelves that
were once lockers.
----------
Niigata joins hands with university, brewers to promote local sake

NIIGATA, Japan - Niigata, one of Japan's major sake producing
regions, is stepping up efforts to promote its sake brands across the
country and overseas in cooperation with a local university and
industry group.
The local prefectural government, Niigata University and the
Niigata Sake Brewers Association will cooperate in establishing a
sake course at the university in the first agreement of its kind in
Japan, according to the government.


Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, May 13 Kyodo

----------
Senior N. Korean diplomat says open to dialogue with U.S., S. Korea

BEIJING - North Korea does not rule out dialogue with the United
States and South Korea, a senior diplomat suggested Saturday, while
mixed messages are emanating from those three countries on future
approaches to Pyongyang's nuclear weapons program.
"If conditions are met, we will hold dialogue (with
Washington)," Choe Son Hui, head of its Foreign Ministry's North
America bureau," told reporters in Beijing before heading back to
Pyongyang, following recent informal discussions with U.S. experts in
Norway.
----------
ILO chief emphasizes need to maintain momentum for work style reform

TOKYO - Work style reform being promoted by Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe is an important step but the real challenge is to maintain
momentum over the longer term, the chief of the International Labor
Organization said Saturday.
Guy Ryder, director general of the ILO, welcomed the Japanese
government's push to address excessive overtime, with Abe seeking to
impose a binding cap and ensure there is no discrimination between
regular and nonregular workers.
----------
Fire breaks out in amusement park in Saitama, no injuries

SAITAMA, Japan - A fire broke out late Friday night at Seibuen
amusement park in Saitama Prefecture neighboring Tokyo, but no one
was injured, police said Saturday.
The fire, which started around 11:30 p.m., appeared to have
consumed around 1,000 square meters before being extinguished about
two hours later. The park in the city of Tokorozawa will be closed
for a while until safety is secured.
----------
Rainy season starts in Japan's Okinawa, Amami

TOKYO - The rainy season appears to have started in the regions
of Okinawa and Amami in southwestern Japan, the weather agency said
Saturday.
This is four days later than average for Okinawa and two days
later for Amami in Kagoshima Prefecture, but three days earlier than
last year for both regions, according to the Japan Meteorological
Agency.
----------
99 countries targeted in global cyberattack

LONDON - Cyberattacks have hit 99 countries, including many in
Europe and Asia, with the public health system in Britain severely
disrupted, U.S. and other media reported Friday.
A total of 75,000 attacks have reportedly been detected
worldwide involving the use of ransomware, a type of malware that
encrypts computer files and makes them inaccessible until the user
pays a ransom.
----------
Japanese researcher shows future of EVs with new wireless technology

KASHIWA, Japan - Electric vehicles, although meant to be the
wave of the future at a time when climate change has become a serious
issue, face a major hurdle: getting them to travel as far as, or even
surpass, fossil-fuel vehicles on a single charge.
To overcome this hurdle, a research group at the University of
Tokyo has been developing a wireless technology that relies on
in-wheel motors to receive a charge while driving on a charging lane
or section of roads embedded with power transmission coils. That, the
group says, will allow EVs to get more distance without heavily
relying on large-capacity batteries.
----------
U.N. panel calls for revising Japan-S. Korea "comfort women" deal

GENEVA - The U.N. Committee against Torture called on Japan and
South Korea to revise their 2015 deal to settle the long-standing row
over women who were forced into wartime Japanese military brothels.
The agreement should be modified to "ensure that the surviving
victims of sexual slavery during World War II are provided with
redress, including the right to compensation and rehabilitation and
the right to truth, reparation and assurances of non-repetitions,"
the committee said in a report.
----------
N. Korea urges U.N. members to reconsider sanctions

NEW YORK - North Korea's permanent mission to the United Nations
on Friday pressed all U.N. member countries to reconsider
implementing sanctions on the nuclear-armed country.
The move came as the U.N. Security Council's panel of experts on
North Korean sanctions steps up efforts to have all members fully
enforce the measures.
----------
Changing mindsets key for pushing women's leadership: confab chief

TOKYO - Changing the cultural mindset entrenched in Japanese
society that underestimates and undervalues women's abilities is not
only key to promoting them to leadership positions, it will also lead
to wider social and financial gains for all.
So said Irene Natividad, president of the Global Summit of
Women, in a recent interview ahead of the group's annual summit which
drew to Tokyo more than 1,300 business and political leaders from
over 60 countries.
----------
Bathhouse reformed as library showcasing 20,000 used comic books

GIFU, Japan - A small comic book library set up over 20 years
ago in a mountainous area of central Japan has proven to be a popular
embodiment of the spirit of recycling, as well as of people's love
for comics.
The building, formerly a public bathhouse run by Gifu city that
used to operate using heat generated by a nearby waste incineration
plant, houses around 20,000 used comic books kept on shelves that
were once lockers.
----------
Niigata joins hands with university, brewers to promote local sake

NIIGATA, Japan - Niigata, one of Japan's major sake producing
regions, is stepping up efforts to promote its sake brands across the
country and overseas in cooperation with a local university and
industry group.
The local prefectural government, Niigata University and the
Niigata Sake Brewers Association will cooperate in establishing a
sake course at the university in the first agreement of its kind in
Japan, according to the government.
----------
Japan, U.S. affirm coordination over N. Korea sanctions

BARI, Italy - Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and U.S.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Friday affirmed close
coordination over sanctions on North Korea, a senior Japanese
official said.
The coordination between the Japanese Finance Ministry and the
U.S. Treasury Department is part of international efforts to rein in
North Korea's aggressive development of nuclear weapons and carrier
missiles.

Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, May 13 Kyodo

----------
99 countries targeted in global cyberattack

LONDON - Cyberattacks have hit 99 countries, including many in
Europe and Asia, with the public health system in Britain severely
disrupted, U.S. and other media reported Friday.
A total of 75,000 attacks have reportedly been detected
worldwide involving the use of ransomware, a type of malware that
encrypts computer files and makes them inaccessible until the user
pays a ransom.
----------
Japanese researcher shows future of EVs with new wireless technology

KASHIWA, Japan - Electric vehicles, although meant to be the
wave of the future at a time when climate change has become a serious
issue, face a major hurdle: getting them to travel as far as, or even
surpass, fossil-fuel vehicles on a single charge.
To overcome this hurdle, a research group at the University of
Tokyo has been developing a wireless technology that relies on
in-wheel motors to receive a charge while driving on a charging lane
or section of roads embedded with power transmission coils. That, the
group says, will allow EVs to get more distance without heavily
relying on large-capacity batteries.
----------
U.N. panel calls for revising Japan-S. Korea "comfort women" deal

GENEVA - The U.N. Committee against Torture called on Japan and
South Korea to revise their 2015 deal to settle the long-standing row
over women who were forced into wartime Japanese military brothels.
The agreement should be modified to "ensure that the surviving
victims of sexual slavery during World War II are provided with
redress, including the right to compensation and rehabilitation and
the right to truth, reparation and assurances of non-repetitions,"
the committee said in a report.
----------
N. Korea urges U.N. members to reconsider sanctions

NEW YORK - North Korea's permanent mission to the United Nations
on Friday pressed all U.N. member countries to reconsider
implementing sanctions on the nuclear-armed country.
The move came as the U.N. Security Council's panel of experts on
North Korean sanctions steps up efforts to have all members fully
enforce the measures.
----------
Changing mindsets key for pushing women's leadership: confab chief

TOKYO - Changing the cultural mindset entrenched in Japanese
society that underestimates and undervalues women's abilities is not
only key to promoting them to leadership positions, it will also lead
to wider social and financial gains for all.
So said Irene Natividad, president of the Global Summit of
Women, in a recent interview ahead of the group's annual summit which
drew to Tokyo more than 1,300 business and political leaders from
over 60 countries.
----------
Bathhouse reformed as library showcasing 20,000 used comic books

GIFU, Japan - A small comic book library set up over 20 years
ago in a mountainous area of central Japan has proven to be a popular
embodiment of the spirit of recycling, as well as of people's love
for comics.
The building, formerly a public bathhouse run by Gifu city that
used to operate using heat generated by a nearby waste incineration
plant, houses around 20,000 used comic books kept on shelves that
were once lockers.
----------
Niigata joins hands with university, brewers to promote local sake

NIIGATA, Japan - Niigata, one of Japan's major sake producing
regions, is stepping up efforts to promote its sake brands across the
country and overseas in cooperation with a local university and
industry group.
The local prefectural government, Niigata University and the
Niigata Sake Brewers Association will cooperate in establishing a
sake course at the university in the first agreement of its kind in
Japan, according to the government.
----------
Japan, U.S. affirm coordination over N. Korea sanctions

BARI, Italy - Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and U.S.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Friday affirmed close
coordination over sanctions on North Korea, a senior Japanese
official said.
The coordination between the Japanese Finance Ministry and the
U.S. Treasury Department is part of international efforts to rein in
North Korea's aggressive development of nuclear weapons and carrier
missiles.
----------
Aso, some G-7 peers cite free trade as key to fight inequality

BARI, Italy - Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and some of his
Group of Seven peers on Friday stressed the importance of promoting
free trade as part of an effort to address inequality, a senior
Japanese Finance Ministry official said.
They made the comment on the first day of a two-day G-7
financial meeting that runs through Saturday in Bari, southern Italy,
at which they were focusing on ways to combat inequality while
leaving trade off the agenda apparently due to a rift over U.S.
President Donald Trump's stance, widely viewed as protectionist.
----------
SoftBank leads $500 mil. investment into U.K. start-up

LONDON - British virtual reality start-up Improbable said Friday
it has raised $502 million in funding led by Japan's SoftBank Group
Corp.
The investment will give SoftBank a "non-controlling" stake,
with Deep Nishar of the Tokyo-based telecom and internet services
giant joining its board, it said in a statement.
Improbable, founded in 2012, focuses on creating virtual worlds
through its SpatialOS platform for use in games and massive-scale
simulations of the real world. It has a workforce of nearly 200, with
offices in London and San Francisco.
----------
Paralympics expenditure estimated at roughly 120 bil. yen

TOKYO - Organizers of the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo have
estimated the overall expenditure for the Paralympics to come to
roughly 120 billion yen (about $1.1 billion), a source close to the
situation said Friday.
The estimated figure, however, is fluid as there are areas where
the spending cannot be clearly divided between the Olympics and the
Paralympics for shared facilities including competition venues, the
source said.
----------
Japan Post mulls acquiring Nomura Real Estate Holdings

TOKYO - Japan Post Holdings Co. is considering buying Nomura
Real Estate Holdings Inc. for several hundred billion yen through a
tender offer, a source close to the matter said Friday.
The Japanese postal, logistics and financial company is in talks
with Nomura Holdings Inc., which owns about a 33 percent stake in the
major real estate firm, and Japan Post is interested in boosting its
profitability by acquiring the real estate developer, according to
the source.

Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, May 13 Kyodo

----------
N. Korea urges U.N. members to reconsider sanctions

NEW YORK - North Korea's permanent mission to the United Nations
on Friday pressed all U.N. member countries to reconsider
implementing sanctions on the nuclear-armed country.
The move came as the U.N. Security Council's panel of experts on
North Korean sanctions steps up efforts to have all members fully
enforce the measures.
----------
Changing mindsets key for pushing women's leadership: confab chief

TOKYO - Changing the cultural mindset entrenched in Japanese
society that underestimates and undervalues women's abilities is not
only key to promoting them to leadership positions, it will also lead
to wider social and financial gains for all.
So said Irene Natividad, president of the Global Summit of
Women, in a recent interview ahead of the group's annual summit which
drew to Tokyo more than 1,300 business and political leaders from
over 60 countries.
----------
Bathhouse reformed as library showcasing 20,000 used comic books

GIFU, Japan - A small comic book library set up over 20 years
ago in a mountainous area of central Japan has proven to be a popular
embodiment of the spirit of recycling, as well as of people's love
for comics.
The building, formerly a public bathhouse run by Gifu city that
used to operate using heat generated by a nearby waste incineration
plant, houses around 20,000 used comic books kept on shelves that
were once lockers.
----------
Niigata joins hands with university, brewers to promote local sake

NIIGATA, Japan - Niigata, one of Japan's major sake producing
regions, is stepping up efforts to promote its sake brands across the
country and overseas in cooperation with a local university and
industry group.
The local prefectural government, Niigata University and the
Niigata Sake Brewers Association will cooperate in establishing a
sake course at the university in the first agreement of its kind in
Japan, according to the government.
----------
74 countries targeted in global cyberattack

LONDON - Cyberattacks have hit 74 countries, including many in
Europe and Asia, with the public health system in Britain severely
disrupted, U.S. and other media reported Friday.
More than 45,000 attacks have been reportedly detected worldwide
involving the use of ransomware, a type of malware that encrypts
computer files and makes them inaccessible until the user pays a
ransom.
----------
Japan, U.S. affirm coordination over N. Korea sanctions

BARI, Italy - Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and U.S.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Friday affirmed close
coordination over sanctions on North Korea, a senior Japanese
official said.
The coordination between the Japanese Finance Ministry and the
U.S. Treasury Department is part of international efforts to rein in
North Korea's aggressive development of nuclear weapons and carrier
missiles.
----------
Aso, some G-7 peers cite free trade as key to fight inequality

BARI, Italy - Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso and some of his
Group of Seven peers on Friday stressed the importance of promoting
free trade as part of an effort to address inequality, a senior
Japanese Finance Ministry official said.
They made the comment on the first day of a two-day G-7
financial meeting that runs through Saturday in Bari, southern Italy,
at which they were focusing on ways to combat inequality while
leaving trade off the agenda apparently due to a rift over U.S.
President Donald Trump's stance, widely viewed as protectionist.
----------
U.N. panel calls for revising Japan-S. Korea "comfort women" deal

GENEVA - The U.N. Committee against Torture called on Japan and
South Korea to revise their 2015 deal to settle the long-standing row
over women who were forced into wartime Japanese military brothels.
The agreement should be modified to "ensure that the surviving
victims of sexual slavery during World War II are provided with
redress, including the right to compensation and rehabilitation and
the right to truth, reparation and assurances of non-repetitions," it
said in a report.
----------
SoftBank leads $500 mil. investment into U.K. start-up

LONDON - British virtual reality start-up Improbable said Friday
it has raised $502 million in funding led by Japan's SoftBank Group
Corp.
The investment will give SoftBank a "non-controlling" stake,
with Deep Nishar of the Tokyo-based telecom and internet services
giant joining its board, it said in a statement.
Improbable, founded in 2012, focuses on creating virtual worlds
through its SpatialOS platform for use in games and massive-scale
simulations of the real world. It has a workforce of nearly 200, with
offices in London and San Francisco.
----------
Paralympics expenditure estimated at roughly 120 bil. yen

TOKYO - Organizers of the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo have
estimated the overall expenditure for the Paralympics to come to
roughly 120 billion yen (about $1.1 billion), a source close to the
situation said Friday.
The estimated figure, however, is fluid as there are areas where
the spending cannot be clearly divided between the Olympics and the
Paralympics for shared facilities including competition venues, the
source said.
----------
Japan Post mulls acquiring Nomura Real Estate Holdings

TOKYO - Japan Post Holdings Co. is considering buying Nomura
Real Estate Holdings Inc. for several hundred billion yen through a
tender offer, a source close to the matter said Friday.
The Japanese postal, logistics and financial company is in talks
with Nomura Holdings Inc., which owns about a 33 percent stake in the
major real estate firm, and Japan Post is interested in boosting its
profitability by acquiring the real estate developer, according to
the source.
----------
25 killed in bomb attack in Pakistan's Balochistan, senator injured

ISLAMABAD - At least 25 people were killed and more than two
dozen injured in a bomb attack Friday on the motorcade of the deputy
chairman of Pakistan's Senate in insurgency-hit Balochistan province,
according to local government officials and media reports.
They said number of fatalities could rise as 10 people injured
in the attack, for which Islamic State militants have reportedly
claimed responsibility, were said to be in critical condition.
Haideri's car was seriously damaged but he suffered only minor
injuries.