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Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, July 14 Kyodo

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Bodies stuffed in bags found, identified as those of missing sisters

YOKOHAMA - Police have found two bodies stuffed in travel bags
in woods southwest of Tokyo and identified them as those of Chinese
sisters in Yokohama who went missing earlier this month, they said
Friday.
Investigative sources suspect the involvement of a man in his
30s who had frequented the restaurant where the elder sister had
worked, based on footage obtained from surveillance cameras near the
condominium where the two women lived.
----------
Macao former chief prosecutor gets 21-year jail sentence

HONG KONG - A Macao court on Friday sentenced the Chinese
territory's former chief prosecutor Ho Chio-meng to 21 years'
imprisonment for fraud, moneylaundering and abuse of power.
Ho, 62, who served as Macao's prosecutor general between 1999
and 2014 and was once tipped to become the former Portuguese
enclave's chief executive, was found guilty of over 1,000 charges,
according to a court document.
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H.K. court disqualifies 4 pro-democracy lawmakers over anti-China vow

HONG KONG - A Hong Kong court on Friday ruled to disqualify four
pro-democracy lawmakers who were sued for failing to take their oaths
correctly during a swearing-in ceremony last October, which they used
to advocate self-determination for Hong Kong.
The High Court ruled that the lawmakers failed to sincerely and
honestly take their oaths by altering their content, displaying props
and engaging in theatrics, and that they be disqualified effective
Oct. 12, their first day in office.
----------
Ex-Pres. Aquino to face charges for botched 2015 police operations

MANILA - Former Philippine President Benigno Aquino will be
charged over a botched 2015 police operation against suspected
international terrorists in the southern province of Maguindanao on
Mindanao island that left 44 elite policemen dead, a prosecution
agency said Friday.
In a statement, the Office of the Ombudsman, which investigates
government officials and employees, said the filing of charges
against Aquino, 57, who was president from 2010 until last year,
stems from his participation in planning the operation with gross
negligence, approving its execution despite knowing it was flawed,
allowing the police chief to take part in the operation despite him
being suspended then, and breaching the chain of command.
----------
Abe says to prioritize human resource development in FY2018 budget

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday fostering human
resources should be given priority in allocating funds under the
fiscal 2018 state budget.
Japan faces the difficult task of securing enough revenue to
cover ballooning social expenses amid its aging population and to pay
for projects to foster economic growth.
----------
China brushes off int'l criticism over death of dissident Liu Xiaobo

BEIJING - China on Friday brushed off criticism from the United
States and some other foreign countries over the death of Nobel Peace
Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo.
A Foreign Ministry spokesman said China has already lodged
"solemn representations" expressing "strong dissatisfaction" to the
United States and other countries making "irresponsible" statements
about its way of dealing with Liu and his illness.
----------
Mahathir, Anwar to jointly lead Malaysia's opposition

KUALA LUMPUR - Malaysia's opposition coalition announced Friday
the appointment of former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad to jointly
lead the coalition with his one-time nemesis Anwar Ibrahim as they
gear up for an imminent general election.
After months of wrangling over accepting the controversial
91-year old Mahathir, who used to jail his opponents during his
22-year iron-fisted rule, the four-party opposition coalition named
him chairman, with Anwar, who is currently in prison for sodomy, the
"de facto leader."
----------
Japan, Jordan PMs meet in Tokyo with refugee crisis in spotlight

TOKYO - The prime ministers of Japan and Jordan sat down for
talks on Friday in Tokyo, where they are expected to discuss ways
Japan can help Jordan manage an influx of refugees from
conflict-mired Syria, which lies to the country's north.
"I would like to express my deep respect for Jordan, which has
generously accepted more than 1.3 million refugees and is giving its
utmost efforts to the fight against terrorism and violent extremism,"
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said at the outset of his meeting
with Jordanian Prime Minister Hani Mulki.
----------
Indonesia renames S. China Sea located within its EEZ

JAKARTA - The Indonesian government on Friday announced an
updated national map in which its exclusive economic zone north of
the Natuna Islands has been renamed from the South China Sea to the
North Natuna Sea.
"We have rights for giving our own name. Oil and gas activities
in northern Natuna had already named the sea as North Natuna," said
Arif Havas Oegroseno, maritime sovereignty deputy of the Coordinating
Ministry for Maritime Affairs.
----------
Chinese authorities place supporters of Liu under house arrest

BEIJING - Chinese security authorities have placed supporters of
Nobel Peace Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo under house arrest, a
prominent activist said Friday.
Hu Jia told Kyodo News that Chinese police have stepped up
security in many places of the country for possible protest
activities and carried out a roundup of his supporters following the
61-year-old's death on Thursday.
----------
Dollar steady in lower 113 yen range ahead of key U.S. inflation data

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar steadied in the lower 113 yen range in
Tokyo on Friday, as market players looked to key inflation data later
in the day for fresh cues on the timing of the next U.S. interest
rate hike.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 113.28-29 yen compared with
113.25-35 yen in New York and 113.12-13 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Thursday. It moved between 113.15 yen and 113.57 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 113.50 yen.
----------
Asia faces "devastating" impact if climate change unabated: study

MANILA - Countries in the Asia Pacific will face soaring
temperatures and other devastating impact from climate change on
health, food security and the environment by the end of the century
unless commitments under the Paris climate accord are met, according
to a study released Friday by the Asian Development Bank.
The potentially drastic changes to the region's ecosystems will
put its population's livelihood and economic growth at stake, and may
even pose an existential threat to some countries in the area, the
report prepared jointly by the Manila-based bank and the
Germany-based Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research warned.

Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, July 14 Kyodo

----------
Indonesia renames S. China Sea located within its EEZ

JAKARTA - The Indonesian government on Friday announced an
updated national map in which its exclusive economic zone north of
the Natuna Islands has been renamed from the South China Sea to the
North Natuna Sea.
"We have rights for giving our own name. Oil and gas activities
in northern Natuna had already named the sea as North Natuna," said
Arif Havas Oegroseno, maritime sovereignty deputy of the Coordinating
Ministry for Maritime Affairs.
----------
Chinese authorities place supporters of Liu under house arrest

BEIJING - Chinese security authorities have placed supporters of
Nobel Peace Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo under house arrest, a
prominent activist said Friday.
Hu Jia told Kyodo News that Chinese police have stepped up
security in many places of the country for possible protest
activities and carried out a roundup of his supporters following the
61-year-old's death on Thursday.
----------
H.K. court disqualifies 4 pro-democracy lawmakers over anti-China vow

HONG KONG - A Hong Kong court on Friday ruled to disqualify four
pro-democracy lawmakers who were sued for failing to take their oaths
correctly during a swearing-in ceremony last October, which they used
to advocate self-determination for Hong Kong.
The High Court ruled that the lawmakers failed to sincerely and
honestly take their oaths by altering their content, displaying props
and engaging in theatrics, and that they be disqualified effective
Oct. 12, their first day in office.
----------
China brushes off int'l criticism over death of dissident Liu Xiaobo

BEIJING - China on Friday brushed off criticism from the United
States and some other foreign countries over the death of Nobel Peace
Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo.
A Foreign Ministry spokesman said China has already lodged
"solemn representations" expressing "strong dissatisfaction" to the
United States and other countries making "irresponsible" statements
about its way of dealing with Liu and his illness.
----------
Dollar steady in lower 113 yen range ahead of key U.S. inflation data

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar steadied in the lower 113 yen range in
Tokyo on Friday, as market players looked to key inflation data later
in the day for fresh cues on the timing of the next U.S. interest
rate hike.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 113.28-29 yen compared with
113.25-35 yen in New York and 113.12-13 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Thursday. It moved between 113.15 yen and 113.57 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 113.50 yen.
----------
Asia faces "devastating" impact if climate change unabated: study

MANILA - Countries in the Asia Pacific will face soaring
temperatures and other devastating impact from climate change on
health, food security and the environment by the end of the century
unless commitments under the Paris climate accord are met, according
to a study released Friday by the Asian Development Bank.
The potentially drastic changes to the region's ecosystems will
put its population's livelihood and economic growth at stake, and may
even pose an existential threat to some countries in the area, the
report prepared jointly by the Manila-based bank and the
Germany-based Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research warned.
----------
Japan's key bond yield flat as BOJ buying operation offsets selling

TOKYO - The yield on the bellwether 10-year Japanese government
bond ended flat Friday as a Bank of Japan bond purchasing operation
offset earlier selling triggered by falling prices in U.S and
European government bonds overnight.
The yield on the No. 347, 0.1 percent issue, the main barometer
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at 0.075
percent, unchanged from Thursday's close.
----------
Osaka files complaint against ex-head of scandal-hit school operator

OSAKA - The western Japan city of Osaka filed on Friday a
criminal complaint with prosecutors against the former chief of a
scandal-hit, nationalist school operator for defrauding it of
subsidies for its kindergarten.
The city alleges the Osaka-based Moritomo Gakuen, at the center
of a land-deal controversy linked to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe,
fraudulently received more than 4.3 million yen ($37,900) in
subsidies in fiscal 2014 and 2015.
----------
Staffing firm Persol to buy Australia's Programmed

TOKYO - Major Japanese human resources firm Persol Holdings Co.
said Friday it will acquire Australian industry peer Programmed
Maintenance Services Ltd. for A$791 million (about 69.1 billion yen).
Persol, formerly known as Temp Holdings Co., said both companies
have already signed relevant contracts and are awaiting Australian
court approval. Persol aims to make Programmed a wholly owned
subsidiary as early as October.
----------
Heavy rain hits Aichi, Gifu prefectures, evacuation ordered

NAGOYA - Heavy rain hit Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central
Japan on Friday, causing river floods and prompting authorities to
issue evacuation orders to some 74,000 residents.
A seasonal rain front brought in wet air, leading to torrential
rainfall measuring 120 millimeters an hour in Inuyama and Komaki
cities in Aichi in the morning, according to the Japan Meteorological
Agency. The Inuyama city office ordered 74,000 residents to evacuate
their home as some houses and roads were flooded and mudslides
occurred at least at three locations in the city.
----------
Tokyo stocks edge higher on record U.S. market close, weaker yen

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks ended slightly higher Friday, driven by
another all-time closing high for the Dow Jones Industrial Average
overnight and the weaker yen.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 19.05 points, or
0.09 percent, from Thursday at 20,118.86. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 6.37
points, or 0.39 percent, higher at 1,625.48.
----------
World mourns Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, calls for wife's release

TOKYO - World leaders and human rights groups have expressed
sorrow at the death Thursday of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo,
praising his fight for freedom and democracy while condemning China
for refusing his wish for overseas treatment of his advanced liver
cancer.
The United States and others also stepped up calls on Beijing to
release the Nobel Peace Prize laureate's widow, Liu Xia, from years
of house arrest and let her depart the country in accordance with her
wishes.

Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, July 14 Kyodo

----------
Staffing firm Persol to buy Australia's Programmed

TOKYO - Major Japanese human resources firm Persol Holdings Co.
said Friday it will acquire Australian industry peer Programmed
Maintenance Services Ltd. for A$791 million (about 69.1 billion yen).
Persol, formerly known as Temp Holdings Co., said both companies
have already signed relevant contracts and are awaiting Australian
court approval. Persol aims to make Programmed a wholly owned
subsidiary as early as October.
----------
Heavy rain hits Aichi, Gifu prefectures, evacuation ordered

NAGOYA - Heavy rain hit Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central
Japan on Friday, causing river floods and prompting authorities to
issue evacuation orders to some 74,000 residents.
A seasonal rain front brought in wet air, leading to torrential
rainfall measuring 120 millimeters an hour in Inuyama and Komaki
cities in Aichi in the morning, according to the Japan Meteorological
Agency. The Inuyama city office ordered 74,000 residents to evacuate
their home as some houses and roads were flooded and mudslides
occurred at least at three locations in the city.
----------
Tokyo stocks edge higher on record U.S. market close, weaker yen

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks ended slightly higher Friday, driven by
another all-time closing high for the Dow Jones Industrial Average
overnight and the weaker yen.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 19.05 points, or
0.09 percent, from Thursday at 20,118.86. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 6.37
points, or 0.39 percent, higher at 1,625.48.
----------
China ignores int'l criticism over death of dissident Liu Xiaobo

BEIJING - China was largely silent Friday over the death of
Nobel Peace Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo, despite mounting
overseas criticism of Beijing for its handling of his illness.
The 61-year-old died of multiple organ failure on Thursday while
serving a lengthy sentence for his writings promoting peaceful
political reforms in China.
----------
World mourns Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, calls for wife's release

TOKYO - World leaders and human rights groups have expressed
sorrow at the death Thursday of Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo,
praising his fight for freedom and democracy while condemning China
for refusing his wish for overseas treatment of his advanced liver
cancer.
The United States and others also stepped up calls on Beijing to
release the Nobel Peace Prize laureate's widow, Liu Xia, from years
of house arrest and let her depart the country in accordance with her
wishes.
----------
2 bodies stuffed in bags found, suspected to be missing sisters

YOKOHAMA - Police found two bodies stuffed in travel bags in
woods in the southwest of Tokyo late Thursday that they suspect
belong to Chinese sisters who went missing recently.
The police received a call on July 7 from a company managing a
condominium in Yokohama where the two women, aged 22 and 25, lived,
saying they could not be reached. Investigative sources said the
police traced the route taken by a car driven by a man caught on a
surveillance camera at the condominium and found the bodies in
Hadano, Kanagawa Prefecture.
----------
Fujifilm starts full-fledged business operations in Myanmar

YANGON - Japan's Fujifilm Corp., an imaging, medical and
graphics product maker, has begun full-fledged business operations in
Myanmar following the establishment of a new group arm for trade to
expand sales in the Southeast Asian country.
Fujifilm Myanmar Investment Ltd., founded in August last year
with a capital of $6 million, has engaged in marketing, sales and
customer services since April, Kenji Sukeno, president of the parent
company, said Monday at its opening ceremony in the Thilawa Special
Economic Zone on the outskirts of commercial hub Yangon.
----------
Japan eyes steps to help farmers impacted by EU trade pact

TOKYO - The Japanese government said Friday it plans to adopt a
policy package in the fall to help dairy and livestock farmers who
will be impacted by the Japan-EU free trade deal agreed on last week.
The package would focus on alleviating possible adverse effects
on those farmers from the future influx of cheaper European food
items including cheese, pork and beef by helping to enhance the
competitiveness of their products, government officials said.
----------
Shopping malls promising despite growing e-commerce in Jakarta

JAKARTA - Shopping malls are still a promising business in
Jakarta despite a growing trend in online retailing as few
entertainment choices are available for family holidaymakers in the
Indonesian capital, according to a U.S.-based global real estate
service company.
Twelve shopping centers with a total floor space of around
600,000 square meters are expected to be completed by 2020, with 38
percent of them now under construction, the local arm of Colliers
International Group Inc. said in its latest retail property outlook
report.
----------
Japan closely watching human rights in China after Liu Xiaobo death

TOKYO - Japan is paying close attention to the state of human
rights in China following the death of Nobel Prize-winning dissident
Liu Xiaobo, the government's top spokesman said Friday.
"Japan will continue to take a high level of interest (in this
issue) and closely watch the state of human rights in China," Chief
Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a press conference at which he
expressed condolences for Liu's death.
----------
Japan to enhance crime victim compensation program

TOKYO - The government will enhance its compensation program for
crime victims starting next year to strengthen support for those
under 18 and victims of offenses against family members, based on a
proposal finalized Friday by a National Police Agency panel.
The panel, comprising legal and other experts, proposed that
benefits for families be raised until all children reach the age of
18.
----------
Senate OKs Trump's pick of Hagerty as U.S. envoy to Japan

WASHINGTON - The Senate on Thursday approved President Donald
Trump's nomination of Tennessee businessman William Hagerty as U.S.
ambassador to Japan.
Hagerty, 57, is expected to take up the post in August,
according to a source familiar with Japan-U.S. relations.


Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, July 14 Kyodo

----------
Dollar rises in lower 113 yen range on higher U.S. Treasury yields

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar rose in the lower 113 yen zone Friday
morning in Tokyo, with buying prompted by a rise in U.S. Treasury
yields.
At noon, the dollar fetched 113.42-43 yen compared with
113.25-35 yen in New York and 113.12-13 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Thursday.
----------
Fujifilm starts full-fledged business operations in Myanmar

YANGON - Japan's Fujifilm Corp., an imaging, medical and
graphics product maker, has begun full-fledged business operations in
Myanmar following the establishment of a new group arm for trade to
expand sales in the Southeast Asian country.
Fujifilm Myanmar Investment Ltd., founded in August last year
with a capital of $6 million, has engaged in marketing, sales and
customer services since April, Kenji Sukeno, president of the parent
company, said Monday at its opening ceremony in the Thilawa Special
Economic Zone on the outskirts of commercial hub Yangon.
----------
Japan's key bond yield rises on higher overseas bond yields

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond rose Friday morning following gains in European and U.S. bond
yields overnight.
The yield on the No. 347, 0.1 percent issue, the main barometer
of long-term interest rates, ended morning interdealer trading at
0.085 percent, up 0.010 percentage point from Thursday's close.
----------
Tokyo stocks gain in morning on strong Wall Street, U.S. data eyed

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rose slightly Friday morning tracking
overnight rises on Wall Street, while investors refrained from
chasing higher ground ahead of a batch of U.S. economic data due out
later in the day.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average rose 45.01 points, or 0.22
percent, from Thursday to 20,144.82. The broader Topix index of all
First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 8.12 points,
or 0.50 percent, to 1,627.23.
----------
Japan eyes steps to help farmers impacted by EU trade pact

TOKYO - The Japanese government said Friday it plans to adopt a
policy package in the fall to help dairy and livestock farmers who
will be impacted by the Japan-EU free trade deal agreed on last week.
The package would focus on alleviating possible adverse effects
on those farmers from the future influx of cheaper European food
items including cheese, pork and beef by helping to enhance the
competitiveness of their products, government officials said.
----------
Shopping malls promising despite growing e-commerce in Jakarta

JAKARTA - Shopping malls are still a promising business in
Jakarta despite a growing trend in online retailing as few
entertainment choices are available for family holidaymakers in the
Indonesian capital, according to a U.S.-based global real estate
service company.
Twelve shopping centers with a total floor space of around
600,000 square meters are expected to be completed by 2020, with 38
percent of them now under construction, the local arm of Colliers
International Group Inc. said in its latest retail property outlook
report.
----------
Japan closely watching human rights in China after Liu Xiaobo death

TOKYO - Japan is paying close attention to the state of human
rights in China following the death of Nobel Prize-winning dissident
Liu Xiaobo, the government's top spokesman said Friday.
"Japan will continue to take a high level of interest (in this
issue) and closely watch the state of human rights in China," Chief
Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a press conference at which he
expressed condolences for Liu's death.
----------
Japan to enhance crime victim compensation program

TOKYO - The government will enhance its compensation program for
crime victims starting next year to strengthen support for those
under 18 and victims of offenses against family members, based on a
proposal finalized Friday by a National Police Agency panel.
The panel, comprising legal and other experts, proposed that
benefits for families be raised until all children reach the age of
18.
----------
Senate OKs Trump's pick of Hagerty as U.S. envoy to Japan

WASHINGTON - The Senate on Thursday approved President Donald
Trump's nomination of Tennessee businessman William Hagerty as U.S.
ambassador to Japan.
Hagerty, 57, is expected to take up the post in August,
according to a source familiar with Japan-U.S. relations.
----------
Australia to introduce laws for police access to encrypted messages

SYDNEY - The Australian government announced Friday it will
introduce new laws that will compel social media companies like
Google and Facebook help law enforcement access encrypted online
messages from suspected terrorists and criminals.
Speaking at a joint press conference with the attorney general,
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the new laws would be used to
assist Australian Federal Police in circumventing barriers that
encryption places when investigating terrorist plots, drug
trafficking rings and child exploitation groups.
----------
"Inhumane" treatment in Japanese hospital behind NZ man's death: kin

TOKYO - The family of a New Zealand man who died in May
following treatment in a Japanese hospital's psychiatric ward are
calling on the government to investigate his death, which they say
occurred after he was restrained to a bed for 10 days in defiance of
international healthcare norms.
Intervention by the health ministry is necessary because despite
suggestions of malpractice, the hospital is refusing to release
relevant medical records or allow a third-party investigation, the
family told Kyodo News on Friday.
----------
Japan gears up to foil nuclear terrorism ahead of Tokyo Olympics

TOKYO - With the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo just
three years away, Japan is stepping up efforts to prevent terrorist
attacks using nuclear and other radioactive materials.
The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed a device that is
capable of detecting nuclear materials during airport baggage
screening and is enhancing its nuclear forensics analytical
technology.

Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, July 14 Kyodo

----------
Japan gears up to foil nuclear terrorism ahead of Tokyo Olympics

TOKYO - With the 2020 Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo just
three years away, Japan is stepping up efforts to prevent terrorist
attacks using nuclear and other radioactive materials.
The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed a device that is
capable of detecting nuclear materials during airport baggage
screening and is enhancing its nuclear forensics analytical
technology.
----------
Tokyo stocks open slightly higher on strong U.S. shares

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks opened slightly higher Friday, tracking an
overnight rise in U.S. shares.
In the first 15 minutes of trading, the 225-issue Nikkei Stock
Average rose 44.53 points, or 0.22 percent, from Thursday to
20,144.34. The broader Topix index of all First Section issues on the
Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 5.44 points, or 0.34 percent, to 1,624.55.
----------
Dollar trades in lower 113 yen zone in early Tokyo deals

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar traded in the lower 113 yen zone early
Friday in Tokyo, up slightly from its overnight levels in New York.
At 9 a.m., the dollar fetched 113.42-44 yen compared with
113.25-35 yen in New York and 113.12-13 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Thursday.
----------
Senate OKs Trump's pick of Hagerty as U.S. envoy to Japan

WASHINGTON - The Senate on Thursday approved President Donald
Trump's nomination of Tennessee businessman William Hagerty as U.S.
ambassador to Japan.
Hagerty, 57, is expected to take up the post in August,
according to a source familiar with Japan-U.S. relations.
----------
U.S. mourns Liu Xiaobo's death, urges China to free his wife

WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Thursday
mourned the death of Nobel Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo and
urged China to release his wife from house arrest and let her depart
the country.
"Today, I join those in China and around the world in mourning
the tragic passing of 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Liu Xiaobo, who
died while serving a lengthy prison sentence in China for promoting
peaceful democratic reform," Tillerson said in a statement issued
after Liu's death Thursday at a hospital in northeastern China.
----------
Nobel committee says China responsible for Liu's death

LONDON/NEW YORK - The Chinese government "bears a heavy
responsibility" for the premature death of jailed Nobel Peace Prize
laureate Liu Xiaobo, the leader of the Norwegian Nobel Committee that
awards the prize said Thursday, after iconic human right defender and
democracy advocate lost his battle with cancer.
Berit Reiss-Andersen said in a statement that saying the
committee received the news of the death of Liu, who received the
Nobel Peace Prize for 2010 for championing human rights in China,
with "regret and great sadness."
----------
Tepco ready to release radioactive, low-toxic tritium into sea

TOKYO - Radioactive tritium, said to pose little risk to human
health, will be released from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear
power complex into the sea, according to a top official of the plant
operator.
"The decision has already been made," Takashi Kawamura, chairman
of Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc., said in a recent
interview with media outlets, referring to the discharge of tritium,
which remains in filtered water even after highly toxic radioactive
materials are removed from water used to cool damaged reactors at the
plant.
----------
H.K. mourns loss of China's Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo

HONG KONG - Hundreds of people in Hong Kong honoring the memory
of China's Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo laid flowers and
offered their respects to the late political dissident at a makeshift
shrine outside Beijing's representative office in the territory hours
after he was announced dead on Thursday.
"We call on people worldwide to commemorate Liu's death and call
for his wife Liu Xia's release from house arrest and to jointly
condemn the communist regime for trampling on human lives," said Lee
Cheuk-yan, secretary general of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of
Patriotic Democratic Movements of China that organized the event.
----------
China's jailed Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo dies at 61

SHENGYANG, China - Nobel Peace Prize-winning dissident Liu
Xiaobo, who was detained and imprisoned numerous times for his
advocacy of human rights and democracy in China, died Thursday of
multiple organ failure, local authorities said. He was 61.
Liu, one of China's most prominent independent intellectuals,
was recently moved to a hospital from prison after he was diagnosed
as being in the final stages of the disease.
----------
U.N. rights chief voices "deep sorrow" over loss of Liu Xiaobo

GENEVA - The top U.N. official in charge of human rights issues
expressed "deep sorrow" Thursday over the death of Chinese dissident
Liu Xiaobo, saying he "was and will continue to be an inspiration and
an example for all human rights defenders."
"The human rights movement in China and across the world has
lost a principled champion who devoted his life to defending and
promoting human rights, peacefully and consistently, and who was
jailed for standing up for his beliefs," U.N. High Commissioner for
Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al Hussein said in a statement.
----------
Australia gov't to mull space agency in review of space capabilities

SYDNEY - The Australian government on Thursday announced a
review of the country's space industry capability, reigniting talk of
setting up a national space agency.
Arthur Sinodinos, minister for industry, innovation and science,
said the review will examine Australia's current capability and areas
of comparative advantage in the sector.
----------
Labor federation nears backing white-collar overtime exemption

TOKYO - Japan's largest labor federation on Thursday moved
closer to giving a green light to a controversial government plan to
allow a merit-based pay system for highly skilled jobs, on condition
that tougher anti-overwork measures be taken.
Rikio Kozu, the head of the Japanese Trade Union Confederation,
known as Rengo, conveyed to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe a set of
revisions it expects over the so-called white-collar overtime
exemption as part of efforts to allay concerns that employees could
be forced to work long hours without proper compensation.