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Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, July 16 Kyodo

----------
Gov't to survey foreign tourists' payments for medical expenses

TOKYO - The health ministry will launch a survey to look into
medical expenses paid by foreign tourists to deal with an apparent
increase in unpaid cases, a source close to the matter said recently.
The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare will study the total
amount of unpaid bills and number of cases at 7,000 hospitals
nationwide and consider measures to address the issue after compiling
a report based on the survey's results by March, the source said.
----------
Abe Cabinet's support rate falls to 35.8%, lowest for current admin

TOKYO - The approval rating for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's
Cabinet has fallen 9.1 points from June to 35.8 percent, the lowest
level since Abe commenced his second stint as premier in 2012, a
Kyodo News poll showed Sunday.
In the nationwide telephone survey conducted Saturday and
Sunday, 77.8 percent of respondents said they were not convinced by
the government's denial of claims that Abe used his influence to
secure the approval of a new department at a university run by a
close friend.
----------
Chongqing party boss under investigation, replaced with Xi loyalist

BEIJING/HONG KONG - Politburo member Sun Zhengcai is under
investigation for serious disciplinary violations and has been
replaced as the top communist party official in Chongqing, Chinese
media reports and other sources said Sunday.
Sun was replaced as the party boss in one of China's most
important cities by Chen Miner, a trusted confidant of President Xi
Jinping and previously the top party official in Guizhou, a
southwestern province.
----------
3 people killed in Kobe, grandson arrested for possessing knife

KOBE - An elderly couple and a woman were found dead Sunday in
Kobe, western Japan, and the couple's 26-year-old grandson was
arrested for possessing a kitchen knife, police said.
The suspect's mother and another woman were also injured, with
all five victims suffered cuts and bruises, according to the Hyogo
prefectural police.
----------
22 people die in apartment building fire in Jiangsu, China

SHANGHAI - At least 22 people died in an apartment fire early
Sunday morning in Jiangsu Province, China, according to local media
reports.
Another three people were injured by the blaze at a two-story
building made of brick and concrete in the city of Changshu, located
about 100 kilometers northwest of Shanghai.
----------
China to create new body to supervise markets, prevent financial risk

BEIJING - The Chinese government plans to establish a new
organization to strengthen supervision of the financial system
through a more holistic approach, according to Chinese media reports.
At the national financial conference that ended Saturday, it was
decided to set up a new organization, the financial stability
development committee, under the State Council, the reports said.
----------
S. Korea minimum hourly wage to be raised by 16.4% next year: Yonhap

SEOUL - The minimum hourly wage in South Korea will be raised by
16.4 percent to 7,530 won ($6.7) next year, Yonhap News Agency
reported, citing unnamed officials.
The South Korean news agency said the decision was made Saturday
during "last-minute negotiations" among labor and management
representatives.
----------
Cambodian PM rejects law providing immunity after leaving office

PHNOM PENH - Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen rejected Saturday
a proposed law guaranteeing him blanket immunity from prosecution
after leaving office.
In an interview with Fresh News, Hun Sen, the longest serving
leader in Asia, dismissed the proposal as a ruse designed to make
Cambodian voters think he was about to lose power, and had reason to
fear prosecution for things done during his 32 years as prime
minister.
----------
Huis Ten Bosch's floating hotel plan moving forward

NAGASAKI - Huis Ten Bosch Co.'s floating capsule hotel project
is progressing, with the Nagasaki Prefecture theme park operator
saying it will begin on-water trials early next year.
A Huis Ten Bosch spokesperson said recently it has ordered the
construction of two of the spherical capsules for tests. The trials
are intended to establish a method for the capsules to be moved
across waters near a resort area where the Dutch-themed attraction is
located.
----------
Niigata marks 10th anniversary of deadly quake

NIIGATA, Japan - A memorial service was held Sunday in Niigata
Prefecture to mark the 10th anniversary of an earthquake that killed
15 people and injured more than 2,300 others in and around the
prefecture.
At the ceremony jointly hosted by the prefecture, the city of
Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, bereaved family members of the
victims and local residents observed a moment of silence at 10:13
a.m., the time when the earthquake struck.
----------
Chinese ships enter Japan waters north of Kyushu for 1st time

FUKUOKA - Two Chinese coast guard ships briefly entered Japanese
waters Saturday around two islands off the southwestern main island
of Kyushu, in the first confirmed entry by Chinese government vessels
into the area, the Japan Coast Guard said.
Under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, vessels of
every country have the right to sail through territorial seas as long
as they do not harm the safety of the countries concerned.
----------
Redistricting law to reduce lower house seats takes effect

TOKYO - A law to revise lower house electoral districts to
reduce voting weight disparities between densely and sparsely
populated constituencies took effect Sunday following a monthlong
period to notify the public about the changes.
The revised Public Offices Election Law reduced the number of
lower house members elected from Aomori, Iwate, Kagoshima, Kumamoto,
Mie and Nara prefectures by one each, with another four seats cut
from proportional representation blocks, shrinking the lower house to
a postwar low of 465 seats.


Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, July 16 Kyodo

----------
3 people killed in Kobe, grandson arrested for possessing knife

KOBE - An elderly couple and a woman were found dead Sunday in
Kobe, western Japan, and the couple's 26-year-old grandson was
arrested for possessing a kitchen knife, police said.
The suspect's mother and another woman were also injured, with
all five victims suffered cuts and bruises, according to the Hyogo
prefectural police.
----------
22 people die in apartment building fire in Jiangsu, China

SHANGHAI - At least 22 people died in an apartment fire early
Sunday morning in Jiangsu Province, China, according to local media
reports.
Another three people were injured by the blaze at a two-story
building made of brick and concrete in the city of Changshu, located
about 100 kilometers northwest of Shanghai.
----------
Abe Cabinet's support rate falls to 35.8%, lowest for current admin

TOKYO - The approval rating for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's
Cabinet has fallen 9.1 points from June to 35.8 percent, the lowest
level since Abe commenced his second stint as premier in 2012, a
Kyodo News poll showed Sunday.
In the nationwide telephone survey conducted Saturday and
Sunday, 77.8 percent of respondents said they were not convinced by
the government's denial of claims that Abe used his influence to
secure the approval of a new department at a university run by a
close friend.
----------
China to create new body to supervise markets, prevent financial risk

BEIJING - The Chinese government plans to establish a new
organization to strengthen supervision of the financial system
through a more holistic approach, according to Chinese media reports.
At the national financial conference that ended Saturday, it was
decided to set up a new organization, the financial stability
development committee, under the State Council, the reports said.
----------
S. Korea minimum hourly wage to be raised by 16.4% next year: Yonhap

SEOUL - The minimum hourly wage in South Korea will be raised by
16.4 percent to 7,530 won ($6.7) next year, Yonhap News Agency
reported, citing unnamed officials.
The South Korean news agency said the decision was made Saturday
during "last-minute negotiations" among labor and management
representatives.
----------
Cambodian PM rejects law providing immunity after leaving office

PHNOM PENH - Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen rejected Saturday
a proposed law guaranteeing him blanket immunity from prosecution
after leaving office.
In an interview with Fresh News, Hun Sen, the longest serving
leader in Asia, dismissed the proposal as a ruse designed to make
Cambodian voters think he was about to lose power, and had reason to
fear prosecution for things done during his 32 years as prime
minister.
----------
Huis Ten Bosch's floating hotel plan moving forward

NAGASAKI - Huis Ten Bosch Co.'s floating capsule hotel project
is progressing, with the Nagasaki Prefecture theme park operator
saying it will begin on-water trials early next year.
A Huis Ten Bosch spokesperson said recently it has ordered the
construction of two of the spherical capsules for tests. The trials
are intended to establish a method for the capsules to be moved
across waters near a resort area where the Dutch-themed attraction is
located.
----------
Niigata marks 10th anniversary of deadly quake

NIIGATA, Japan - A memorial service was held Sunday in Niigata
Prefecture to mark the 10th anniversary of an earthquake that killed
15 people and injured more than 2,300 others in and around the
prefecture.
At the ceremony jointly hosted by the prefecture, the city of
Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, bereaved family members of the
victims and local residents observed a moment of silence at 10:13
a.m., the time when the earthquake struck.
----------
Chinese ships enter Japan waters north of Kyushu for 1st time

FUKUOKA - Two Chinese coast guard ships briefly entered Japanese
waters Saturday around two islands off the southwestern main island
of Kyushu, in the first confirmed entry by Chinese government vessels
into the area, the Japan Coast Guard said.
Under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, vessels of
every country have the right to sail through territorial seas as long
as they do not harm the safety of the countries concerned.
----------
Redistricting law to reduce lower house seats takes effect

TOKYO - A law to revise lower house electoral districts to
reduce voting weight disparities between densely and sparsely
populated constituencies took effect Sunday following a monthlong
period to notify the public about the changes.
The revised Public Offices Election Law reduced the number of
lower house members elected from Aomori, Iwate, Kagoshima, Kumamoto,
Mie and Nara prefectures by one each, with another four seats cut
from proportional representation blocks, shrinking the lower house to
a postwar low of 465 seats.
----------
Russia denies Hokkaido mayor entry over Japan's sanctions

TOKYO - Russia has denied entry to disputed islands to a mayor
from Hokkaido in retaliation for sanctions imposed by Japan over the
Ukraine crisis, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
Nemuro Mayor Shunsuke Hasegawa was disallowed to join a five-day
study tour through July 1 to assess the potential for joint economic
activities on the islands off the northernmost prefecture that are
controlled by Moscow but claimed by Tokyo, the sources said.
----------
Int'l meeting ends without agreement on Japan saury quota proposal

TOKYO - An international meeting ended Saturday without
approving a Japan proposal to set country-by-country quotas for saury
to prevent overfishing, as it was opposed by China, Russia and South
Korea, the Fisheries Agency said.
The seven countries and Taiwan participating in the North
Pacific Fisheries Commission will continue discussing the issue at
the next meeting to be held next July in Japan, the agency said.

Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, July 16 Kyodo

----------
Cambodian PM rejects law providing immunity after leaving office

PHNOM PENH - Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen rejected Saturday
a proposed law guaranteeing him blanket immunity from prosecution
after leaving office.
In an interview with Fresh News, Hun Sen, the longest serving
leader in Asia, dismissed the proposal as a ruse designed to make
Cambodian voters think he was about to lose power, and had reason to
fear prosecution for things done during his 32 years as prime
minister.
----------
Huis Ten Bosch's floating hotel plan moving forward

NAGASAKI - Huis Ten Bosch Co.'s floating capsule hotel project
is progressing, with the Nagasaki Prefecture theme park operator
saying it will begin on-water trials early next year.
A Huis Ten Bosch spokesperson said recently it has ordered the
construction of two of the spherical capsules for tests. The trials
are intended to establish a method for the capsules to be moved
across waters near a resort area where the Dutch-themed attraction is
located.
----------
Niigata marks 10th anniversary of deadly quake

NIIGATA, Japan - A memorial service was held Sunday in Niigata
Prefecture to mark the 10th anniversary of an earthquake that killed
15 people and injured more than 2,300 others in and around the
prefecture.
At the ceremony jointly hosted by the prefecture, the city of
Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, bereaved family members of the
victims and local residents observed a moment of silence at 10:13
a.m., the time when the earthquake struck.
----------
3 die in Kobe, man arrested for possessing knife

KOBE - An elderly couple and a woman were found dead Sunday in
Kobe in western Japan and a 26-year-old male relative of the couple
was arrested for possessing a kitchen knife nearby, police said.
Two other women were injured. The Hyogo prefectural police are
investigating the incident on suspicion of murder and attempted
murder.
----------
Chinese ships enter Japan waters north of Kyushu for 1st time

FUKUOKA - Two Chinese coast guard ships briefly entered Japanese
waters Saturday around two islands off the southwestern main island
of Kyushu, in the first confirmed entry by Chinese government vessels
into the area, the Japan Coast Guard said.
Under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, vessels of
every country have the right to sail through territorial seas as long
as they do not harm the safety of the countries concerned.
----------
Redistricting law to reduce lower house seats takes effect

TOKYO - A law to revise lower house electoral districts to
reduce voting weight disparities between densely and sparsely
populated constituencies took effect Sunday following a monthlong
period to notify the public about the changes.
The revised Public Offices Election Law reduced the number of
lower house members elected from Aomori, Iwate, Kagoshima, Kumamoto,
Mie and Nara prefectures by one each, with another four seats cut
from proportional representation blocks, shrinking the lower house to
a postwar low of 465 seats.
----------
Russia denies Hokkaido mayor entry over Japan's sanctions

TOKYO - Russia has denied entry to disputed islands to a mayor
from Hokkaido in retaliation for sanctions imposed by Japan over the
Ukraine crisis, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
Nemuro Mayor Shunsuke Hasegawa was disallowed to join a five-day
study tour through July 1 to assess the potential for joint economic
activities on the islands off the northernmost prefecture that are
controlled by Moscow but claimed by Tokyo, the sources said.
----------
Int'l meeting ends without agreement on Japan saury quota proposal

TOKYO - An international meeting ended Saturday without
approving a Japan proposal to set country-by-country quotas for saury
to prevent overfishing, as it was opposed by China, Russia and South
Korea, the Fisheries Agency said.
The seven countries and Taiwan participating in the North
Pacific Fisheries Commission will continue discussing the issue at
the next meeting to be held next July in Japan, the agency said.
----------
H.K. commemorates death of China's Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo

HONG KONG - About 2,000 people in Hong Kong mourned the death of
China's Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo in a march protest late
Saturday, while criticizing China's inhumane treatment of the
democracy advocate.
After an hourlong stroll in silence, the crowd laid flowers and
signed a condolence book at a makeshift shrine set up outside
Beijing's representative office in the city.
----------
Gov't OKs treating via telemedicine patients who wish to quit smoking

TOKYO - The health ministry has approved allowing doctors to
treat via smartphones or personal computers patients who wish to quit
smoking, ministry officials said Saturday.
The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry informed all 47
prefectures of the change, which took effect last Friday.
----------
Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo's ashes scattered in sea

SHENYANG, China - The ashes of deceased Chinese Nobel Peace
Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo were scattered Saturday in the sea by his
family members, one of them said, in a step seen by critics as an
attempt by Beijing to obliterate any traces of the famed dissident
following his death this week while in custody.
Chinese authorities likely feared the possibility of a grave of
Liu being built somewhere and becoming an influential monument for
pro-democracy movements in the future. They might have demanded his
family members, including his wife, Liu Xia, to consent to the sea
burial.
----------
Northern Kyushu faces growing trip cancellations after rain disaster

FUKUOKA - The northern Kyushu region of southwestern Japan,
where people are struggling to restore lives following recent
torrential rains, now faces another problem -- a growing number of
trip cancellations to the area.
Tourists appear to be shying away from famous resorts near the
disaster-hit areas, such as the hot spring resorts of Beppu and
Yufuin in Oita Prefecture and Kurokawa hot spring in Kumamoto
Prefecture.

Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, July 16 Kyodo

----------
3 die in Kobe, man arrested for possessing knife

KOBE - An elderly couple and a woman were found dead Sunday in
Kobe in western Japan and a 26-year-old male relative of the couple
was arrested for possessing a kitchen knife nearby, police said.
Two other women were injured. The Hyogo prefectural police are
investigating the incident on suspicion of murder and attempted
murder.
----------
Chinese ships enter Japan waters north of Kyushu for 1st time

FUKUOKA - Two Chinese coast guard ships briefly entered Japanese
waters Saturday around two islands off the southwestern main island
of Kyushu, in the first confirmed entry by Chinese government vessels
into the area, the Japan Coast Guard said.
Under the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, vessels of
every country have the right to sail through territorial seas as long
as they do not harm the safety of the countries concerned.
----------
Redistricting law to reduce lower house seats takes effect

TOKYO - A law to revise lower house electoral districts to
reduce voting weight disparities between densely and sparsely
populated constituencies took effect Sunday following a monthlong
period to notify the public about the changes.
The revised Public Offices Election Law reduced the number of
lower house members elected from Aomori, Iwate, Kagoshima, Kumamoto,
Mie and Nara prefectures by one each, with another four seats cut
from proportional representation blocks, shrinking the lower house to
a postwar low of 465 seats.
----------
Russia denies Hokkaido mayor entry over Japan's sanctions

TOKYO - Russia has denied entry to disputed islands to a mayor
from Hokkaido in retaliation for sanctions imposed by Japan over the
Ukraine crisis, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
Nemuro Mayor Shunsuke Hasegawa was disallowed to join a five-day
study tour through July 1 to assess the potential for joint economic
activities on the islands off the northernmost prefecture that are
controlled by Moscow but claimed by Tokyo, the sources said.
----------
Int'l meeting ends without agreement on Japan saury quota proposal

TOKYO - An international meeting ended Saturday without
approving a Japan proposal to set country-by-country quotas for saury
to prevent overfishing, as it was opposed by China, Russia and South
Korea, the Fisheries Agency said.
The seven countries and Taiwan participating in the North
Pacific Fisheries Commission will continue discussing the issue at
the next meeting to be held next July in Japan, the agency said.
----------
H.K. commemorates death of China's Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo

HONG KONG - About 2,000 people in Hong Kong mourned the death of
China's Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo in a march protest late
Saturday, while criticizing China's inhumane treatment of the
democracy advocate.
After an hourlong stroll in silence, the crowd laid flowers and
signed a condolence book at a makeshift shrine set up outside
Beijing's representative office in the city.
----------
Gov't OKs treating via telemedicine patients who wish to quit smoking

TOKYO - The health ministry has approved allowing doctors to
treat via smartphones or personal computers patients who wish to quit
smoking, ministry officials said Saturday.
The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry informed all 47
prefectures of the change, which took effect last Friday.
----------
Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo's ashes scattered in sea

SHENYANG, China - The ashes of deceased Chinese Nobel Peace
Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo were scattered Saturday in the sea by his
family members, one of them said, in a step seen by critics as an
attempt by Beijing to obliterate any traces of the famed dissident
following his death this week while in custody.
Chinese authorities likely feared the possibility of a grave of
Liu being built somewhere and becoming an influential monument for
pro-democracy movements in the future. They might have demanded his
family members, including his wife, Liu Xia, to consent to the sea
burial.
----------
Soccer: Dortmund edge Urawa in preseason friendly

SAITAMA, Japan - Andre Schurrle struck a late winner as Shinji
Kagawa's Borussia Dortmund beat Urawa Reds 3-2 on Saturday to score
their first win under new coach Peter Bosz in a preseason friendly
for the Bundesliga side.
Reds more than held their own against Dortmund and Shinzo Koroki
fired the home side in front midway through the first half before two
goals in the space of three second-half minutes from substitute Emre
Mor put Dortmund 2-1 up.
----------
Baseball: Despaigne blasts PL to 2nd straight victory

CHIBA - Alfredo Despaigne returned to his old stomping grounds
and mashed, hitting a game-tying homer as the Pacific League came
from behind to beat the Central League 3-1 on Saturday and sweep this
year's two-game All-Star series.
After both starting pitchers matched zeroes for two innings,
light-hitting Yomiuri Giants catcher Seiji Kobayashi opened the
scoring in the third with a solo homer off Orix Buffaloes ace Chihiro
Kaneko.
----------
Northern Kyushu faces growing trip cancellations after rain disaster

FUKUOKA - The northern Kyushu region of southwestern Japan,
where people are struggling to restore lives following recent
torrential rains, now faces another problem -- a growing number of
trip cancellations to the area.
Tourists appear to be shying away from famous resorts near the
disaster-hit areas, such as the hot spring resorts of Beppu and
Yufuin in Oita Prefecture and Kurokawa hot spring in Kumamoto
Prefecture.
----------
U.S. court holds off decision about Toshiba chip unit sale

SAN FRANCISCO - A U.S. court held off a decision Friday as to
whether to grant Western Digital Corp. an injunction blocking Toshiba
Corp.'s chip unit sale, but an agreement was reached requiring the
Japanese company provide advance notice of any transaction.
The Superior Court of California set another hearing for July 28
and Judge Harold Kahn suggested the stipulation that Toshiba must
notify its joint venture partner two weeks before closing the sale of
its flash memory business.

Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, July 16 Kyodo

----------
Redistricting law to reduce lower house seats takes effect

TOKYO - A law to revise lower house electoral districts to
reduce voting weight disparities between densely and sparsely
populated constituencies took effect Sunday following a monthlong
period to notify the public about the changes.
The revised Public Offices Election Law reduced the number of
lower house members elected from Aomori, Iwate, Kagoshima, Kumamoto,
Mie and Nara prefectures by one each, with another four seats cut
from proportional representation blocks, shrinking the lower house to
a postwar low of 465 seats.
----------
Russia denies Hokkaido mayor entry over Japan's sanctions

TOKYO - Russia has denied entry to disputed islands to a mayor
from Hokkaido in retaliation for sanctions imposed by Japan over the
Ukraine crisis, diplomatic sources said Saturday.
Nemuro Mayor Shunsuke Hasegawa was disallowed to join a five-day
study tour through July 1 to assess the potential for joint economic
activities on the islands off the northernmost prefecture that are
controlled by Moscow but claimed by Tokyo, the sources said.
----------
Chinese gov't ships enter Japan waters where never seen before

FUKUOKA - Two Chinese coast guard ships were spotted Saturday in
Japanese waters around Okinoshima island and one near Tsushima
Island, in the first confirmation of an intrusion by Chinese
government vessels in the area, the Japan Coast Guard said.
One Chinese coast guard ship was spotted Saturday morning in
waters around Tsushima Island, and two were sighted near Okinoshima
island in the afternoon, the Japanese coast guard said. Tsushima
Island is located about half way between the southern tip of the
Korean Peninsula and the northwest coast of Kyushu, Japan's
westernmost main island.
----------
Int'l meeting ends without agreement on Japan saury quota proposal

TOKYO - An international meeting ended Saturday without
approving a Japan proposal to set country-by-country quotas for saury
to prevent overfishing, as it was opposed by China, Russia and South
Korea, the Fisheries Agency said.
The seven countries and Taiwan participating in the North
Pacific Fisheries Commission will continue discussing the issue at
the next meeting to be held next July in Japan, the agency said.
----------
H.K. commemorates death of China's Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo

HONG KONG - About 2,000 people in Hong Kong mourned the death of
China's Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo in a march protest late
Saturday, while criticizing China's inhumane treatment of the
democracy advocate.
After an hourlong stroll in silence, the crowd laid flowers and
signed a condolence book at a makeshift shrine set up outside
Beijing's representative office in the city.
----------
Gov't OKs treating via telemedicine patients who wish to quit smoking

TOKYO - The health ministry has approved allowing doctors to
treat via smartphones or personal computers patients who wish to quit
smoking, ministry officials said Saturday.
The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry informed all 47
prefectures of the change, which took effect last Friday.
----------
Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo's ashes scattered in sea

SHENYANG, China - The ashes of deceased Chinese Nobel Peace
Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo were scattered Saturday in the sea by his
family members, one of them said, in a step seen by critics as an
attempt by Beijing to obliterate any traces of the famed dissident
following his death this week while in custody.
Chinese authorities likely feared the possibility of a grave of
Liu being built somewhere and becoming an influential monument for
pro-democracy movements in the future. They might have demanded his
family members, including his wife, Liu Xia, to consent to the sea
burial.
----------
Soccer: Dortmund edge Urawa in preseason friendly

SAITAMA, Japan - Andre Schurrle struck a late winner as Shinji
Kagawa's Borussia Dortmund beat Urawa Reds 3-2 on Saturday to score
their first win under new coach Peter Bosz in a preseason friendly
for the Bundesliga side.
Reds more than held their own against Dortmund and Shinzo Koroki
fired the home side in front midway through the first half before two
goals in the space of three second-half minutes from substitute Emre
Mor put Dortmund 2-1 up.
----------
Baseball: Despaigne blasts PL to 2nd straight victory

CHIBA - Alfredo Despaigne returned to his old stomping grounds
and mashed, hitting a game-tying homer as the Pacific League came
from behind to beat the Central League 3-1 on Saturday and sweep this
year's two-game All-Star series.
After both starting pitchers matched zeroes for two innings,
light-hitting Yomiuri Giants catcher Seiji Kobayashi opened the
scoring in the third with a solo homer off Orix Buffaloes ace Chihiro
Kaneko.
----------
Northern Kyushu faces growing trip cancellations after rain disaster

FUKUOKA - The northern Kyushu region of southwestern Japan,
where people are struggling to restore lives following recent
torrential rains, now faces another problem -- a growing number of
trip cancellations to the area.
Tourists appear to be shying away from famous resorts near the
disaster-hit areas, such as the hot spring resorts of Beppu and
Yufuin in Oita Prefecture and Kurokawa hot spring in Kumamoto
Prefecture.
----------
U.S. court holds off decision about Toshiba chip unit sale

SAN FRANCISCO - A U.S. court held off a decision Friday as to
whether to grant Western Digital Corp. an injunction blocking Toshiba
Corp.'s chip unit sale, but an agreement was reached requiring the
Japanese company provide advance notice of any transaction.
The Superior Court of California set another hearing for July 28
and Judge Harold Kahn suggested the stipulation that Toshiba must
notify its joint venture partner two weeks before closing the sale of
its flash memory business.
----------
Rugby: Sunwolves close out 2nd season by hammering Blues

TOKYO - The Sunwolves wrapped up their second Super Rugby season
on a winning note Saturday, coming from behind to beat the Blues
48-21.
In arguably the best performance in their short history, Filo
Tiatia's side demolished the three-time winners from Auckland in
sweltering heat, which reached 43 C pitchside at Prince Chichibu
Memorial Rugby Ground.