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Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, Sept. 7 Kyodo

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Abe, Putin slam N. Korea nuke test, differ on denuclearization path

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday condemned the latest
nuclear test by North Korea as a "grave threat" to the region but
remained at odds over the path toward its denuclearization.
Meeting on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic Forum in the
Russian Far East city of Vladivostok, Abe and Putin also agreed to
conduct joint economic activities on disputed islands off Japan's
northernmost main island of Hokkaido in five areas -- aquaculture,
greenhouse farming, tourism, wind power, and waste reduction.
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ECB leaves easy monetary policy unchanged

FRANKFURT - The European Central Bank left its easy monetary
policy unchanged at its governing council meeting Thursday.
The central bank for eurozone member countries kept its deposit
rate at minus 0.4 percent and its purchases of bonds and other assets
at 60 billion euros ($71.9 billion) per month.
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2 IS sympathizers arrested in Singapore in July

SINGAPORE - Two Singaporeans were separately arrested in July on
suspicion of being Islamic State sympathizers, including one who
allegedly planned to attack Singapore military personnel overseas,
the Ministry of Home Affairs said Thursday.
Imran Kassim, a 34-year-old managing director of a logistics
company, and Shakirah Begam Abdul Wahab, a 23-year-old administrative
assistant, were arrested under the Internal Security Act, which
allows for detention without trial.
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Xi's trusted aide to enter Communist Party's most powerful body

BEIJING - China's Communist Party is set to promote Li Zhanshu,
one of the closest aides to leader Xi Jinping, and Vice Premier Wang
Yang to its next Politburo Standing Committee after October's party
congress, multiple party sources said Thursday.
Current and former top members of the party discussed a
reshuffle of the currently seven-member standing committee, China's
apex of power, during their annual conclave in the resort town of
Beidaihe, about 300 kilometers east of Beijing, last month, said the
sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
----------
Abu Sayyaf releases 2 Indonesian hostages in southern Philippines

JAKARTA - Two Indonesian sailors taken hostage last year by the
al-Qaida-linked Abu Sayyaf militant group were released Thursday
morning, Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi said.
Retno told reporters in Singapore, a record of which was made
available to journalists in Jakarta, that Saparudin bin Koni and
Sawal bin Maryam were freed at 6:30 a.m. and are currently undergoing
health examinations on Sulu Island.
----------
JAL inspects 12 Boeing 777 planes after engine fire incident

TOKYO - Japan Airlines Co. is inspecting the engines of 12 of
its Boeing 777 planes after the same type of aircraft recently made
an emergency landing due to an engine fire, company officials said
Thursday.
A JAL plane bound for New York landed back safely shortly after
leaving Tokyo's Haneda airport Tuesday morning, when flames were seen
coming from the left engine. A total of 251 passengers and crew
members were aboard the plane, but no one was injured.
----------
Japanese lawmaker Inoki in N. Korea amid high tensions

PYONGYANG/BEIJING - Japanese wrestler-turned-lawmaker Antonio
Inoki arrived in North Korea on Thursday to possibly meet with the
country's top official in charge of foreign affairs, amid deepening
tensions over its nuclear and missile programs.
Inoki, an independent lawmaker who has developed uniquely close
ties with North Korea, said he is planning to hold talks with Ri Su
Yong, known as a trusted confidant of leader Kim Jong Un, when he
spoke to the press at Beijing's international airport before leaving
for Pyongyang.
----------
MSDF says helicopter crash in sea caused by human error

TOKYO - The Maritime Self-Defense Force said Thursday a recent
helicopter crash off northeastern Japan in which three of the four
crewmen remain missing was caused by human error.
The helicopter plunged into the Sea of Japan off Aomori
Prefecture on Aug. 26 as crew members were trying to fix an error
with the bearing indicator, according to the MSDF's investigation
report.
----------
Panasonic to cease solar battery production in western Japan

OSAKA - Panasonic Corp. said Thursday it will end solar battery
production at a western Japan plant by the end of next March and
transfer operations to a Malaysian factory amid slowing domestic
demand.
Demand for solar photovoltaic systems is declining in Japan
mainly because of the falling price of solar-generated electricity
under the government's feed-in tariff system.
----------
LDP to mull higher tax on heat-not-burn tobacco products

TOKYO - The ruling Liberal Democratic Party will consider
raising the tax rate on heat-not-burn tobacco products under a review
of the current tax system for the year starting next April, its tax
panel chief said Thursday.
"We would have to make a conclusion by the end of the year,"
Yoichi Miyazawa, who heads the LDP's tax panel, said in an interview
with Kyodo News and other media outlets.
----------
S. Korean installs 4 additional U.S. anti-missile system launchers

SEOUL - South Korea on Thursday installed four additional
advanced U.S. missile defense launchers, known as the Terminal High
Altitude Area Defense system, to better insure against the escalating
threat from North Korea.
"The government provisionally deployed the four remaining THAAD
system launchers from the U.S. Forces in South Korea in order to
protect people's lives and safety from North Korea's ever-escalating
nuclear and missile threats," South Korean Defense Ministry spokesman
Moon Sang Gyun said.
----------
Dollar hovers in lower 109 yen zone ahead of ECB meeting

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered mostly in the 109 yen zone on
Thursday in Tokyo, with market players refraining from making bold
moves ahead of the European Central Bank's policy meeting later in
the day.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 108.99-109.01 yen compared with
109.19-29 yen in New York and 108.78-80 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Wednesday. It moved between 108.90 yen and 109.26 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 109.08 yen.

Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, Sept. 7 Kyodo

----------
Panasonic to cease solar battery production in western Japan

OSAKA - Panasonic Corp. said Thursday it will end solar battery
production at a western Japan plant by the end of next March and
transfer operations to a Malaysian factory amid slowing domestic
demand.
Demand for solar photovoltaic systems is declining in Japan
mainly because of the falling price of solar-generated electricity
under the government's feed-in tariff system.
----------
LDP to mull higher tax on heat-not-burn tobacco products

TOKYO - The ruling Liberal Democratic Party will consider
raising the tax rate on heat-not-burn tobacco products under a review
of the current tax system for the year starting next April, its tax
panel chief said Thursday.
"We would have to make a conclusion by the end of the year,"
Yoichi Miyazawa, who heads the LDP's tax panel, said in an interview
with Kyodo News and other media outlets.
----------
S. Korean installs 4 additional U.S. anti-missile system launchers

SEOUL - South Korea on Thursday installed four additional
advanced U.S. missile defense launchers, known as the Terminal High
Altitude Area Defense system, to better insure against the escalating
threat from North Korea.
"The government provisionally deployed the four remaining THAAD
system launchers from the U.S. Forces in South Korea in order to
protect people's lives and safety from North Korea's ever-escalating
nuclear and missile threats," South Korean Defense Ministry spokesman
Moon Sang Gyun said.
----------
Abe, Putin to discuss N. Korea tensions, isles row

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
Russian President Vladimir Putin held talks Thursday during which
they were expected to discuss heightened North Korea tensions and
ways to promote joint economic activities on disputed islands off
Japan's Hokkaido.
Meeting on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic Forum in the
Russian Far East city of Vladivostok, Abe is hoping to get Russia's
support for strengthening pressure on North Korea, which conducted
its sixth nuclear test Sunday following recent missile launches in
defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions.
----------
Dollar hovers in lower 109 yen zone ahead of ECB meeting

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered mostly in the 109 yen zone on
Thursday in Tokyo, with market players refraining from making bold
moves ahead of the European Central Bank's policy meeting later in
the day.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 108.99-109.01 yen compared with
109.19-29 yen in New York and 108.78-80 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Wednesday. It moved between 108.90 yen and 109.26 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 109.08 yen.
----------
China supports U.N. taking necessary steps on N. Korea

BEIJING - China is supportive of the U.N. Security Council
taking further necessary steps on North Korea, Foreign Minister Wang
Yi said Thursday, as numerous other countries are seeking to penalize
Pyongyang with tougher sanctions following its sixth nuclear test.
"China agrees with the U.N. Security Council to make a further
reaction and take necessary measures," Wang told reporters in Beijing.
----------
MSDF says helicopter crash in sea caused by human error

TOKYO - The Maritime Self-Defense Force said Thursday a recent
helicopter crash off the coast of northeastern Japan in which three
of the four crewmen remain missing was caused by human error.
The helicopter plunged into the Sea of Japan off Aomori
Prefecture on Aug. 26 while crew members were trying to fix an error
with the bearing indicators' reading, according to the MSDF's
investigation report.
----------
Japan's key bond yield rises after weak demand in 30-year auction

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond ended higher Thursday as investors sold the debt after a 30-year
bond auction showed weak demand.
The yield on the No. 348, 0.1 percent issue, the main barometer
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at 0.010
percent, up 0.005 percentage point from Wednesday's close.
----------
Taiwan's Cabinet resigns en masse amid waning support

TAIPEI - Outgoing Taiwan Premier Lin Chuan led his Cabinet to an
en masse resignation on Thursday following his offer over the weekend
to step down, making way for a new government that will take office
the next day.
After gathering for a photo on the square of the Executive Yuan
building, Lin told his Cabinet ministers that no matter how well his
team had performed over the past 15 months, it is time to pass the
baton.
----------
Nikkei bounces back following U.S. share gains

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rose Thursday, with the Nikkei index
snapping a three-day losing streak, after New York shares gained
overnight on reports that the United States is set to avoid a
government shutdown.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 38.55 points, or
0.20 percent, from Wednesday at 19,396.52. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 6.24
points, or 0.39 percent, higher at 1,598.24.
----------
Damaged U.S. destroyer to be transported to Yokosuka in Sept.

YOKOSUKA, Japan - The U.S. Navy said Wednesday it will transport
the damaged guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain to its home
base in Yokosuka later this month in the wake of its collision with
an oil tanker east of the Strait of Malacca.
The ship will be carried by a heavy lift vessel from the Changi
naval base in Singapore to the U.S. Navy's ship repair facility in
the eastern Japanese city near Tokyo.
----------
Osaka medical center staff working under excessive overtime contract

OSAKA - Doctors and nurses at a national medical center in Osaka
can work up to 300 hours of overtime per month under a
union-management agreement, official data obtained by a lawyer showed
Thursday.
The overtime cap is three times the 100 hours per month the
government deems as risking death from overwork, a phenomenon
commonly known in Japan by the term "karoshi."

Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, Sept. 7 Kyodo

----------
Damaged U.S. destroyer to be transported to Yokosuka in Sept.

YOKOSUKA, Japan - The U.S. Navy said Wednesday it will transport
the damaged guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain to its home
base in Yokosuka later this month in the wake of its collision with
an oil tanker east of the Strait of Malacca.
The ship will be carried by a heavy lift vessel from the Changi
naval base in Singapore to the U.S. Navy's ship repair facility in
the eastern Japanese city near Tokyo.
----------
Osaka medical center staff working under excessive overtime contract

OSAKA - Doctors and nurses at a national medical center in Osaka
can work up to 300 hours of overtime per month under a
union-management agreement, official data obtained by a lawyer showed
Thursday.
The overtime cap is three times the 100 hours per month the
government deems as risking death from overwork, a phenomenon
commonly known in Japan by the term "karoshi."
----------
Nikkei bounces back following U.S. share gains

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rose Thursday, with the Nikkei index
snapping a three-day losing streak, after New York stocks gained
overnight on reports that the United States is set to avoid a
government shutdown.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 38.55 points, or
0.20 percent, from Wednesday at 19,396.52. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 6.24
points, or 0.39 percent, higher at 1,598.24.
----------
Opposition lawmaker faces calls to quit over report of affair

TOKYO - Shiori Yamao, a prosecutor-turned-lawmaker and rising
star within the main opposition Democratic Party, is considering her
future amid calls for her resignation after a magazine report that
she became involved in an extramarital affair, party sources said
Thursday.
Her resignation would be a blow to the party and its new leader,
Seiji Maehara, as it seeks voters' support ahead of a trio of
by-elections on Oct. 22, the first polls since the former foreign
minister took the leadership.
----------
Ex-nursery teacher gets prison term for child porn crime

SENDAI - A former male nursery school teacher was sentenced to
15 years in prison Thursday for sexually abusing preschool girls and
filming the acts in the northeastern city of Sendai.
The Sendai District Court said that from October 2015 to October
2016 Ryota Abe, 27, removed the underwear of 10 girls aged 3 to 6 at
the nursery school where he worked, pressed his body against them and
filmed the acts with his smartphone.
----------
U.N. seeks more aid as 146,000 people flee Myanmar violence

NEW YORK - An estimated 146,000 people have fled Myanmar's
strife-torn Rakhine State to seek refuge in neighboring Bangladesh
since violence broke out there two weeks ago, the United Nations said
Wednesday.
The World Food Program is appealing for $11.3 million to support
the new influx of people crossing the border into the Bangladeshi
district of Cox's Bazar, in addition to those already living in camps
there, said Stephane Dujarric, spokesman for U.N. Secretary General
Antonio Guterres.
----------
Japanese lawmaker Inoki heads for N. Korea amid high tensions

BEIJING - Japanese wrestler-turned-lawmaker Antonio Inoki headed
for North Korea on Thursday to possibly meet with the country's top
official in charge of foreign affairs, amid deepening tensions over
its nuclear and missile programs.
Inoki, an independent lawmaker who has developed uniquely close
ties with North Korea, said he is planning to hold talks with Ri Su
Yong, known as a trusted confidant of leader Kim Jong Un, when he
spoke to the press at Beijing's international airport before leaving
for Pyongyang.
----------
Miniature dachshund receives award from police for stopping intruder

TOYAMA, Japan - Police presented a bravery award Thursday to a
pet dog for helping capture a burglar at a home in Toyama Prefecture
on the Sea of Japan coast in May.
The miniature dachshund, named Lucy, alerted her owner in
Namerikawa to the presence of an intruder, leading to his arrest.
----------
Subaru to cease diesel-powered car sales by around 2020, focus on EVs

TOKYO - Subaru Corp. will stop selling diesel-powered cars by
around 2020 to focus on electric vehicle development amid
intensifying global competition, sources close to the matter said
Thursday.
Subaru currently offers diesel engine cars in its Forester and
Outback models in Europe and Australia. The Japanese automaker sells
some 15,000 units of diesel-powered cars annually, accounting for
roughly 1.5 percent of its total global sales.
----------
FEATURE: Japanese armor returns to life in suburban British home

BRIGHTON, England - Robert Soanes perhaps was not your typical
British teenager. But he never considered himself to be a warrior,
either.
But while most of his friends were following traditional
pursuits, Soanes's childhood love of East Asia was flourishing, with
a passion for martial arts, samurai swords and armor.
----------
Abe, Moon agree on stronger pressure on N. Korea through sanctions

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
South Korean President Moon Jae In agreed Thursday to exert stronger
pressure on North Korea in the wake of a recent nuclear test by
Pyongyang, including by the adoption of tougher U.N. sanctions.
The leaders, meeting in Vladivostok, Russia, also agreed on
coordinating bilaterally and with the United States, their mutual
security ally, to call on China and Russia in dealing with threats
from North Korea, according to a Japanese official who was at the
talks.
----------
ASEAN economic ministers meeting starts in Manila

MANILA - Economic ministers of the Association of Southeast
Asian Nations commenced a series of meetings on Thursday in Manila,
with a China-backed regional trade pact expected to be a major focus
at the five-day event.
Negotiations on the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership
are expected on the fourth day of the 49th ASEAN Economic Ministers
Meeting, the second to last occasion this year where the envisioned
trade agreement will be discussed.


Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, Sept. 7 Kyodo

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Sumo: Yokozuna Kisenosato, Kakuryu pull out of autumn tourney

TOKYO - Yokozuna Kisenosato and Kakuryu have pulled out of the
upcoming Autumn Grand Sumo Tournament due to injuries, their
respective stablemasters said Thursday.
The announcement of their withdrawal, which came three days
before the start of the meet at Ryogoku Kokugikan in Tokyo, once
again dashed fans' hopes of seeing all four grand champions compete
from the start to end of a single basho.
----------
Western Digital eyes 16% voting rights in Toshiba chip unit in future

TOYKO - Western Digital Corp. is planning to take voting rights
of a little less than 16 percent in Toshiba Corp.'s chip unit after
it goes public in the future, sources close to the matter said
Thursday.
The months-long complicated bidding process surrounding Toshiba
Memory Corp. could take a major step forward if Toshiba and Western
Digital, a key member of the consortium bidding for the chip unit,
can come to terms on how the U.S. company will be involved in
management -- the focal point in current negotiations.
----------
Abe's special envoy asks Iran's help to put pressure on N. Korea

TEHRAN - A special envoy of Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on
Wednesday called on Iranian President Hassan Rouhani to cooperate in
putting more pressure on North Korea following Pyongyang's sixth
nuclear test earlier this month.
But the Iranian president, whose country has long had amicable
relations with North Korea, told Masahiko Komura that dialogue is
needed, indicating Tehran is eager to seek a different approach than
Japan.
----------
Dollar hovers in lower 109 yen zone in Tokyo morning deals

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar hovered in the lower 109 yen zone
Thursday morning in Tokyo after drawing buying overnight on news that
President Donald Trump struck a deal with Democrats in Congress to
extend the U.S. debt limit.
At noon, the dollar fetched 109.09-10 yen compared with
109.19-29 yen in New York and 108.78-80 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Wednesday.
----------
Tokyo stocks rise in morning on Wall Street gains

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks bounced back Thursday morning after Wall
Street received a boost overnight from reports U.S. President Donald
Trump had struck a deal to raise the debt limit until mid-December,
avoiding a government shutdown.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average rose 72.22 points, or 0.37
percent, from Wednesday to 19,430.19. The broader Topix index of all
First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 9.35 points,
or 0.59 percent, to 1,601.35.
----------
Japan's key bond yield rises ahead of 30-year debt auction

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond rose Thursday morning as investors sold the debt to adjust their
holdings ahead of a 30-year bond auction later in the day.
The yield on the No. 348, 0.1 percent issue, the main yardstick
of long-term interest rates, ended morning interdealer trading at
0.010 percent, up 0.005 percentage point from Wednesday's close.
----------
S. Korea installs 4 more U.S. anti-missile system launchers

SEOUL - South Korea on Thursday installed four additional
advanced U.S. missile defense launchers, known as the Terminal High
Altitude Area Defense system, to better insure against the escalating
threat from North Korea.
"The government provisionally deployed the four remaining THAAD
system launchers from the U.S. Forces in South Korea in order to
protect people's lives and safety from North Korea's ever-escalating
nuclear and missile threats," South Korean Defense Ministry spokesman
Moon Sang Gyun said.
----------
Japan sees record number of cybercrime reports in 1st half of 2017

TOKYO - Japanese authorities logged a record number of reported
cybercrimes in the first half of 2017, the National Police Agency
said Thursday, while warning of a new scam in which virtual currency
accounts are hacked for illicit money transfers.
The police say they received 69,977 reports in the January to
June period, up 4.9 percent from a year earlier and the highest since
2001 when comparable data became available.
----------
Abe, Moon agree on stronger pressure on N. Korea through sanctions

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
South Korean President Moon Jae In agreed Thursday to exert stronger
pressure on North Korea in the wake of a recent nuclear test by
Pyongyang, including by the adoption of tougher U.N. sanctions.
The leaders, meeting in Vladivostok, Russia, also agreed on
coordinating bilaterally and with the United States, their mutual
security ally, to call on China and Russia in dealing with threats
from North Korea, according to a Japanese official who was at the
talks.
----------
Fed No. 2 official Fischer to resign in Oct.

WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer said
Wednesday he will step down from his post at the U.S. central bank in
October, citing "personal reasons."
The announcement, made in a letter to President Donald Trump,
came amid uncertainty about the Fed's leadership with Chair Janet
Yellen's term expiring in February. It is unknown whether Trump will
nominate her for a second four-year term.
----------
New U.N. sanctions resolution eyes oil embargo on N. Korea

NEW YORK - The U.N. Security Council is mulling an oil embargo
on North Korea in a bid to coerce the isolated country to give up its
weapons programs, according to the first draft of a sanctions
resolution obtained by Kyodo News on Wednesday.
The draft text says U.N. member states shall "prohibit the
direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer" to North Korea of all
crude oil, condensates, refined petroleum products and natural gas
liquids.
----------
Abe, Putin to discuss N. Korea tensions, isles row

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
Russian President Vladimir Putin will hold talks Thursday on
heightening North Korea tensions and ways to promote joint economic
activities on disputed islands off Japan's Hokkaido.
Meeting on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic Forum in the
Russian Far East city of Vladivostok, Abe hopes to get Russia's
support for strengthening pressure on North Korea, which conducted
its sixth nuclear test Sunday following recent missile launches in
defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions.

Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, Sept. 7 Kyodo

----------
Tokyo stocks open higher on Wall Street gains

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks opened higher Thursday, tracking overnight
gains on Wall Street as concerns eased over the U.S. debt ceiling.
In the first 15 minutes of trading, the 225-issue Nikkei Stock
Average rose 102.33 points, or 0.53 percent, from Wednesday to
19,460.30. The broader Topix index of all First Section issues on the
Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 10.03 points, or 0.63 percent, to
1,602.03.
----------
Dollar trades in lower 109 yen range in early Tokyo deals

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar traded in the lower 109 yen range early
Thursday in Tokyo, little changed from its overnight levels in New
York.
At 9 a.m., the dollar fetched 109.15-16 yen compared with
109.19-29 yen in New York and 108.78-80 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Wednesday.
----------
Abe, Moon meet with eye on strengthening pressure on N. Korea

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
South Korean President Moon Jae In held talks Thursday in the Russian
Far East, where they are set to confirm coordination in seeking
tougher sanctions on North Korea in the wake of a recent nuclear test.
The leaders, meeting on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic
Forum in Vladivostok, will also agree on bolstering bilateral ties as
well as with the United States, their mutual security ally, in
addressing threats from Pyongyang, which also launched a ballistic
missile that flew over northern Japan in late August.
----------
New U.N. sanctions resolution eyes oil embargo on N. Korea

NEW YORK - The U.N. Security Council is mulling an oil embargo
on North Korea in a bid to coerce the isolated country to give up its
weapons programs, according to the first draft of a sanctions
resolution obtained by Kyodo News on Wednesday.
The draft text says U.N. member states shall "prohibit the
direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer" to North Korea of all
crude oil, condensates, refined petroleum products and natural gas
liquids.
----------
Abe, Putin to discuss N. Korea tensions, isles row

VLADIVOSTOK, Russia - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and
Russian President Vladimir Putin will hold talks Thursday on
heightening North Korea tensions and ways to promote joint economic
activities on disputed islands off Japan's Hokkaido.
Meeting on the sidelines of the Eastern Economic Forum in the
Russian Far East city of Vladivostok, Abe hopes to get Russia's
support for strengthening pressure on North Korea, which conducted
its sixth nuclear test Sunday following recent missile launches in
defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions.
----------
U.S., China vow coordination toward denuclearizing N. Korea

WASHINGTON - U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President
Xi Jinping on Wednesday condemned North Korea over its sixth and most
powerful nuclear test and pledged to step up coordination in ridding
Pyongyang of nuclear weapons.
During telephone talks, Trump and Xi "condemned North Korea's
latest provocative and destabilizing action" and agreed that "North
Korea's current path is dangerous to the world," the White House said
in a statement.
----------
Fed Vice Chairman Fischer to resign in Oct.

WASHINGTON - Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer is
stepping down from his post at the central bank in October, the Fed
said Wednesday.
Citing "personal reasons," Fischer said in a resignation letter
to President Donald Trump that his departure will take place on or
around Oct. 13, according to the Fed.
----------
Adviser on World Heritage shows interest in U.S. base transfer plan

NAHA, Japan - An international advisory body on natural sites
nominated for the World Heritage status has shown interest in the
environmental implications of a plan to build a new U.S. military
base in Okinawa, as the location of the base is next to an area
seeking to be listed, local officials said Wednesday.
The International Union for Conservation of Nature plans to
visit the candidate site in Okinawa possibly in the fall and is also
wishing to discuss the environmental problems linked to the plan to
transfer U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma within Okinawa, which
involves reclaiming land off the coastal area of Henoko, the
officials and others said.
----------
Japan to help Indonesia develop Natuna, 5 more outer islands

JAKARTA - Japan and Indonesia agreed Wednesday to develop
infrastructure and promote the fishing industry on six outer islands,
including Natuna on the southern edge of the South China Sea where
foreign fishing vessels continue to operate illegally.
The agreement was reached in talks between Indonesian Maritime
Affairs and Fisheries Minister Susi Pujiastuti and Hiroto Izumi, a
special adviser to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.
----------
U.S. trade deficit with Japan widens 3.7% in July

WASHINGTON - The U.S. goods trade deficit with Japan in July
widened 3.7 percent from the previous month to $5.78 billion, partly
due to an increase in imports of passenger cars, the Commerce
Department said Wednesday.
The deficit with China grew 3.0 percent to $33.56 billion, the
department said.
----------
India's Modi voices solidarity with Suu Kyi amid Rohingya crisis

NAYPYITAW - India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi held a summit
with Myanmar's leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Wednesday, discussing ways
to boost bilateral ties and expressing solidarity amid ongoing
violence and displacement in the Southeast Asian country affecting
its long-oppressed Rohingya Muslim minority.
On the sidelines of the summit, their two governments also
signed a number of agreements including those on maritime security
cooperation, the sharing of shipping information, the organizing of
elections and on cultural exchange, according to officials from both
sides.
----------
Cambodia gov't sues shuttered daily's management over taxes

PHNOM PENH - The Cambodian tax authority on Wednesday filed
lawsuits against the owner and management of The Cambodia Daily,
which was forced to close down earlier this week, for alleged tax
evasion.
The General Department of Taxation filed the lawsuits with the
Phnom Penh Municipal Court against the English-language newspaper's
owner Deborah Krisher-Steele, general manager and editor-in-chief
Douglas Steele, as well as founder and publisher Bernard Krisher,
according to the department's director general Kong Vibol.