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Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, Sept. 11 Kyodo

----------
ASEAN "re-calibrates" objectives to speed up RCEP negotiations

MANILA - Trade ministers of most countries negotiating the
Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership have adjusted their goals
for the China-backed regional trade agreement, Philippine Trade
Secretary Ramon Lopez said Monday.
Lopez, speaking after five days of ministerial meetings
involving the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and countries
from outside the region, said 13 of the 16 negotiating parties,
including all 10 ASEAN members, agreed to a key elements paper that
will guide the desirable trade offers for the RCEP agreement.
----------
Japanese industry minister arrives in Thailand, EEC in spotlight

BANGKOK - Japanese Economy, Trade and Industry Minister
Hiroshige Seko on Monday arrived in Thailand with a nearly 600-strong
business delegation on a visit aimed at further strengthening
economic exchanges between the two countries.
Thailand in particular hopes to attract Japanese investment to
its "Eastern Economic Corridor," a landmark project aimed at
developing three eastern provinces into a flagship technology hub.
----------
Cambodian parliament passes motion against opposition leader

PHNOM PENH - The Cambodian National Assembly voted on Monday to
allow a court investigation into arrested opposition leader Kem Sokha.
The motion was passed by 67 lawmakers from the ruling Cambodian
People's Party. Lawmakers of Kem Sokha's Cambodia National Rescue
Party boycotted the session.
----------
U.N. draft sanctions resolution on N. Korea includes oil export cap

NEW YORK - The U.N. Security Council will vote Monday on a new
sanctions resolution that would place the first restrictions on
exports of crude oil and petroleum products to North Korea, according
to a final draft of the resolution obtained by Kyodo News.
Watered down from an earlier U.S.-penned draft that called for a
total oil embargo, it would impose an annual limit on crude oil
exports to the North -- prohibiting the level from exceeding that of
the previous 12 months -- and would cap the annual supply or export
of refined petroleum products at 2 million barrels.
----------
Taiwanese NGO worker on trial in China pleads guilty to subversion

TAIPEI - A Taiwanese human rights advocate detained in China on
suspicion of state security violations pleaded guilty on Monday,
Taiwan media reported.
Lee Ming-cheh, standing trial in a court in China, admitted that
he attempted to topple the state power by "spreading articles and
information to maliciously attack the current system of the
Communist Party of China and the Chinese government," according to
the Central News Agency.
----------
Rohingya treatment "textbook example of ethnic cleansing": U.N.

GENEVA - The top U.N. rights official said Monday that Myanmar
authorities' "brutal security operation" in strife-torn Rakhine State
appears to be "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing" against the
country's persecuted, stateless Rohingya people.
Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the U.N. high commissioner for human
rights, said in an address to the Human Rights Council that the
military operation, prompted by Rohingya militants attacks on police
posts on Aug. 25, "is clearly disproportionate and without regard for
basic principles of international law."
----------
N. Korea warns U.S. will pay "due price" if new sanctions approved

BEIJING - North Korea said Monday that the United States will
pay a "due price" and experience the "greatest pain and suffering" if
additional sanctions pushed by Washington are approved by the U.N.
Security Council over Pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test yet
about a week ago.
North Korea said in a statement that the rest of the world will
witness how it "tames the U.S. gangsters by taking series of action
tougher than they have ever envisaged."
----------
Tokyo commuter train catches fire, 300 passengers evacuate on tracks

TOKYO - A commuter train caught fire Sunday afternoon in Tokyo
after being stopped next to a building along the tracks that was
ablaze, forcing some 300 passengers to evacuate.
No one was hurt in the incident that occurred on the Odawara
Line operated by Odakyu Electric Railway Co. between Sangubashi and
Yoyogi-hachiman stations, but about 71,000 people were affected by
subsequent delays.
----------
Dollar rises to mid-108 yen as N. Korea worries recede

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar rose to the mid-108 yen range Monday in
Tokyo as a sense of relief spread after North Korea celebrated the
69th anniversary of its founding without fresh nuclear or missile
tests.
At 5 p.m., the dollar traded at 108.42-43 yen compared with
107.80-90 yen in New York and 107.74-75 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Friday. It moved between 108.16 yen and 108.61 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 108.45 yen.
----------
Gov't eyes additional Japan Post share sale worth 1.4 tril. yen

TOKYO - The Japanese government will sell a second tranche of
its shareholdings in Japan Post Holdings Co., the Finance Ministry
said Monday, with its estimated 1.4 trillion yen ($13 billion)
proceeds destined for post-quake reconstruction.
The sale will involve the unloading of some 990 million shares,
or 22 percent of Japan Post's outstanding shares, with a selling
price set somewhere between Sept. 25 and 27.
----------
Japan's key bond yield up in negative territory on N. Korea inaction

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond rose in negative territory Monday as investors sold the debt
amid easing risk aversion after North Korean military provocations
did not occur over the weekend.
The yield on the No. 348, 0.1 percent issue, the main barometer
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at minus 0.005
percent, up 0.005 percentage point from Friday's close.
----------
Honda to co-develop EV technology with China IT firm Neusoft

TOKYO - Honda Motor Co. said Monday it will co-develop with
Chinese information technology firm Neusoft a battery management
system that will be used in an electric vehicle it plans to launch in
China next year.
The Japanese carmaker and Chinese firm will also cooperate in
driving data management and connected-car technology development that
can be used in car-sharing services.

Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, Sept. 11 Kyodo

----------
Tokyo commuter train catches fire, 300 passengers evacuate on tracks

TOKYO - A commuter train caught fire Sunday afternoon in Tokyo
after being stopped next to a building along the tracks that was
ablaze, forcing some 300 passengers to evacuate.
No one was hurt in the incident that occurred on the Odawara
Line operated by Odakyu Electric Railway Co. between Sangubashi and
Yoyogi-hachiman stations, but about 71,000 people were affected by
subsequent delays.
----------
Dollar rises to mid-108 yen as N. Korea worries recede

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar rose to the mid-108 yen range Monday in
Tokyo as a sense of relief spread after North Korea celebrated the
69th anniversary of its founding without fresh nuclear or missile
tests.
At 5 p.m., the dollar traded at 108.42-43 yen compared with
107.80-90 yen in New York and 107.74-75 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Friday. It moved between 108.16 yen and 108.61 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 108.45 yen.
----------
Gov't eyes additional Japan Post share sale worth 1.4 tril. yen

TOKYO - The Japanese government will sell a second tranche of
its shareholdings in Japan Post Holdings Co., the Finance Ministry
said Monday, with its estimated 1.4 trillion yen ($13 billion)
proceeds destined for post-quake reconstruction.
The sale will involve the unloading of some 990 million shares,
or 22 percent of Japan Post's outstanding shares, with a selling
price set somewhere between Sept. 25 and 27.
----------
Japan's key bond yield up in negative territory on N. Korea inaction

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond rose in negative territory Monday as investors sold the debt
amid easing risk aversion after North Korean military provocations
did not occur over the weekend.
The yield on the No. 348, 0.1 percent issue, the main barometer
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at minus 0.005
percent, up 0.005 percentage point from Friday's close.
----------
Honda to co-develop EV technology with China IT firm Neusoft

TOKYO - Honda Motor Co. said Monday it will co-develop with
Chinese information technology firm Neusoft a battery management
system that will be used in an electric vehicle it plans to launch in
China next year.
The Japanese carmaker and Chinese firm will also cooperate in
driving data management and connected-car technology development that
can be used in car-sharing services.
----------
U.S. says pilot error led to Dec. Osprey crash-landing off Okinawa

NAHA, Japan - The U.S. military has concluded pilot error caused
one of its Osprey aircraft to crash-land in waters off Okinawa last
December, while denying any mechanical malfunction in the aircraft
itself, the Japanese government said Monday.
The findings were announced as safety concerns over the aircraft
remain strong in the southern island prefecture where the bulk of
U.S. military facilities in the country are based. In August alone,
one Osprey crashed off Australia, resulting in the death of three
U.S. Marines, while another made an emergency landing at a commercial
airport in Oita Prefecture, southwestern Japan.
----------
Tokyo stocks up after N. Korea missile inaction, strong machinery data

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rebounded Monday, with the Nikkei index
ending at its highest point in more than a week, amid relief after
North Korea did not conduct a missile launch on the weekend and
robust Japanese core machinery orders data for July.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 270.95 points, or
1.41 percent, from Friday at 19,545.77. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 18.72
points, or 1.17 percent, higher at 1,612.26.
----------
U.N. Security Council to vote on capping oil exports to N. Korea

NEW YORK - The U.N. Security Council is poised to vote on a new
sanctions resolution that would place a ceiling on crude oil exports
to North Korea and ban the export of liquefied natural gas, according
to the final draft of the resolution.
The attempt to restrict North Korea's access to oil is part of
efforts by the United States and like-minded Security Council members
to pressure the North to abandon its nuclear and ballistic missile
program, particularly following a sixth nuclear test on Sept. 3. But
the final draft fell short of including a complete ban on oil exports.
----------
Advance voting for New Zealand's general election begins

SYDNEY - Advance voting began Monday for New Zealand's general
election later this month, with opinion polls seeing a close race
between the ruling National Party and the main opposition Labour
Party.
According to Radio New Zealand, the country's electoral
commission is predicting that up to half of all voters will cast
their ballot before the Sept. 23 election.
----------
N. Korea warns U.S. will pay "due price" if new sanctions approved

BEIJING - North Korea said Monday that the United States will
pay a "due price" and experience the "greatest pain and suffering" if
additional sanctions pushed by Washington are approved by the U.N.
Security Council over Pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test yet
about a week ago.
North Korea said in a statement that the rest of the world will
witness how it "tames the U.S. gangsters by taking series of action
tougher than they have ever envisaged."
----------
Taiwanese NGO worker on trial in China pleads guilty to subversion

TAIPEI - A Taiwanese human rights advocate detained in China on
suspicion of state security violations pleaded guilty on Monday,
Taiwan media reported.
Lee Ming-cheh, standing trial in a court in China, admitted that
he attempted to topple the state power by "spreading articles and
information to maliciously attack the current system of the Communist
Party of China and the Chinese government," according to Central News
Agency.
----------
N. Korea to push arms program, top official tells Japanese lawmaker

BEIJING/PYONGYANG - North Korea's top official in charge of
foreign affairs said Pyongyang will continue striving toward the
"last goal" of its nuclear and missile development programs, a
Japanese parliamentarian revealed Monday following their meeting.
Japanese wrestler-turned-lawmaker Antonio Inoki disclosed some
of his discussions with Ri Su Yong, a vice chairman of the Workers'
Party of Korea, upon his arrival at Beijing's international airport,
shortly after ending his five-day visit to Pyongyang.

Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, Sept. 11 Kyodo

----------
U.N. Security Council to vote on capping oil exports to N. Korea

NEW YORK - The U.N. Security Council is poised to vote on a new
sanctions resolution that would place a ceiling on crude oil exports
to North Korea and ban the export of liquefied natural gas, according
to the final draft of the resolution.
The attempt to restrict North Korea's access to oil is part of
efforts by the United States and like-minded Security Council members
to pressure the North to abandon its nuclear and ballistic missile
program, particularly following a sixth nuclear test on Sept. 3. But
the final draft fell short of including a complete ban on oil exports.
----------
Tokyo stocks up after N. Korea missile inaction, strong machinery data

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rebounded Monday, with the Nikkei index
ending at its highest point in more than a week, amid relief after
North Korea did not conduct a missile launch on the weekend and
robust Japanese core machinery orders data for July.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 270.95 points, or
1.41 percent, from Friday at 19,545.77. The broader Topix index of
all First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 18.72
points, or 1.17 percent, higher at 1,612.26.
----------
Advance voting for New Zealand's general election begins

SYDNEY - Advance voting began Monday for New Zealand's general
election later this month, with opinion polls seeing a close race
between the ruling National Party and the main opposition Labour
Party.
According to Radio New Zealand, the country's electoral
commission is predicting that up to half of all voters will cast
their ballot before the Sept. 23 election.
----------
N. Korea warns U.S. will pay "due price" if new sanctions approved

BEIJING - North Korea said Monday that the United States will
pay a "due price" and experience the "greatest pain and suffering" if
additional sanctions pushed by Washington are approved by the U.N.
Security Council over Pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test yet
about a week ago.
North Korea said in a statement that the rest of the world will
witness how it "tames the U.S. gangsters by taking series of action
tougher than they have ever envisaged."
----------
Taiwanese NGO worker on trial in China pleads guilty to subversion

TAIPEI - A Taiwanese human rights advocate detained in China on
suspicion of state security violations pleaded guilty on Monday,
Taiwan media reported.
Lee Ming-cheh, standing trial in a court in China, admitted that
he attempted to topple the state power by "spreading articles and
information to maliciously attack the current system of the Communist
Party of China and the Chinese government," according to Central News
Agency.
----------
N. Korea to push arms program, top official tells Japanese lawmaker

BEIJING/PYONGYANG - North Korea's top official in charge of
foreign affairs said Pyongyang will continue striving toward the
"last goal" of its nuclear and missile development programs, a
Japanese parliamentarian revealed Monday following their meeting.
Japanese wrestler-turned-lawmaker Antonio Inoki disclosed some
of his discussions with Ri Su Yong, a vice chairman of the Workers'
Party of Korea, upon his arrival at Beijing's international airport,
shortly after ending his five-day visit to Pyongyang.
----------
Police say Japanese couple found dead murdered over business woes

DENPASAR, Indonesia - Police said Monday they believe an elderly
Japanese couple found dead in Bali last week were murdered, citing
business troubles as a possible motive.
Denpasar Police Chief Hadi Purnomo told reporters that
investigators will "bring in a business colleague from Japan in the
near future for questioning" in connection with the deaths of Norio
Matsuba, 76, and his wife Hiroko, 73.
----------
Tokyo commuter train catches fire, 300 passengers evacuate on tracks

TOKYO - A commuter train caught fire Sunday afternoon in Tokyo
after being stopped next to a building along the tracks that was
ablaze, forcing some 300 passengers to evacuate.
No one was hurt in the incident that occurred on the Odawara
Line operated by Odakyu Electric Railway Co. between Sangubashi and
Yoyogi-hachiman stations, but about 71,000 people were affected by
subsequent delays.
----------
Japan, Jordan vow to steadily implement U.N. sanctions on N. Korea

AMMAN - Japan and Jordan on Sunday confirmed the importance of
steadily implementing U.N. sanctions on North Korea to tackle the
reclusive nation's provocations including a nuclear test, a Japanese
government official said.
During their talks in Jordan's capital, Japanese Foreign
Minister Taro Kono told his Jordanian counterpart Ayman Safadi that
Tokyo is calling on countries that have amicable relations with the
North to stop accepting laborers from Pyongyang, the official said.
----------
U.S. says pilot error led to Dec. Osprey crash-landing off Okinawa

NAHA, Japan - The United States military has concluded pilot
error caused one of its Osprey aircraft to crash-land in waters off
Japan's southern island of Okinawa in December, the Japanese
government said Monday.
The finding was part of a final report released following a
series of accidents involving the tilt-rotor aircraft in Japan and
abroad which stirred safety concerns in Okinawa, where the bulk of
U.S. military facilities in the country are based.
----------
Tennis: Kamiji wins women's wheelchair singles at U.S. Open

NEW YORK - World No. 1 Yui Kamiji earned her third Grand Slam
title of the season by winning the women's singles final at the U.S.
Open wheelchair championships on Sunday.
The top-seeded Japanese beat the second-seeded Diede de Groot of
the Netherlands 7-5, 6-2 in the 1-hour, 11-minute match at the Billie
Jean King National Tennis Center to be crowned U.S. Open champion for
the second time following her victory in 2014.
----------
Japan's July machinery orders up 8.0%, 1st rise in 4 months

TOKYO - Japan's core private-sector machinery orders increased
8.0 percent on month in July, the first rise in four months, boosted
by a recovery in the manufacturing sector and strong demand for train
cars, government data showed Monday.
The orders, which exclude those for ships and from utilities
because of their volatility, came to 853.3 billion yen ($7.9
billion), according to the Cabinet Office. They marked the fastest
pace of gain since January last year and followed a 1.9 percent drop
in June.

Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, Sept. 11 Kyodo

----------
Tokyo commuter train catches fire, 300 passengers evacuate on tracks

TOKYO - A commuter train caught fire Sunday afternoon in Tokyo
after being stopped next to a building along the tracks that was
ablaze, forcing some 300 passengers to evacuate.
No one was hurt in the incident that occurred on the Odawara
Line operated by Odakyu Electric Railway Co. between Sangubashi and
Yoyogi-hachiman stations, but about 71,000 people were affected by
subsequent delays.
----------
Tokyo stocks rise on N. Korea inaction, upbeat Japan machinery data

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rose sharply Monday morning as concerns
eased after a North Korean missile launch did not eventuate over the
weekend, and as Japan's robust July core machinery orders data
spurred optimism over the economy.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average rose 266.54 points, or 1.38
percent, from Friday to 19,541.36. The broader Topix index of all
First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 21.64 points,
or 1.36 percent, to 1,615.18.
----------
Japan's key bond yield rises amid relief at N. Korea inaction

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond rose Monday morning as investors sold the safe-haven asset on
relief that North Korean military provocations did not occur over the
weekend.
The yield on the No. 348, 0.1 percent issue, the main barometer
of long-term interest rates, ended morning interdealer trading at
0.000 percent, up 0.010 percentage point from Friday's close.
----------
Dollar rises to lower 108 yen amid relief after N. Korea inaction

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar rose to the lower 108 yen range Monday
morning in Tokyo, as a sense of relief spread after North Korea did
not make any provocation on its national foundation day.
At noon, the dollar fetched 108.39-40 yen compared with
107.80-90 yen in New York and 107.74-75 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m. Friday.
----------
Japanese lawmaker Inoki ends 5-day visit to N. Korea

PYONGYANG - Japanese wrestler-turned-lawmaker Antonio Inoki
ended his five-day visit to North Korea on Monday after meeting with
senior officials at a time of high tensions over Pyongyang's weapons
program.
Those Inoki met included Ri Su Yong, a vice chairman of the
Workers' Party of Korea, its top official in charge of foreign
affairs.
----------
Tennis: Kamiji wins women's wheelchair singles at U.S. Open

NEW YORK - World No. 1 Yui Kamiji earned her third Grand Slam
title of the season by winning the women's singles final at the U.S.
Open wheelchair championships on Sunday.
The top-seeded Japanese beat the second-seeded Diede de Groot of
the Netherlands 7-5, 6-2 in the 1-hour, 11-minute match at the Billie
Jean King National Tennis Center to be crowned U.S. Open champion for
the second time following her victory in 2014.
----------
Japan's July machinery orders up 8.0%, 1st rise in 4 months

TOKYO - Japan's core private-sector machinery orders increased
8.0 percent on month in July, the first rise in four months, boosted
by a recovery in the manufacturing sector and strong demand for train
cars, government data showed Monday.
The orders, which exclude those for ships and from utilities
because of their volatility, came to 853.3 billion yen ($7.9
billion), according to the Cabinet Office. They marked the fastest
pace of gain since January last year and followed a 1.9 percent drop
in June.
----------
N. Korea warns U.S. will pay "due price" over tighter U.N. sanctions

BEIJING - North Korea warned on Monday that the United States
will pay a "due price" and experience the "greatest pain and
suffering" if it pushes for new and tighter U.N. sanctions following
Pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test yet earlier in the month.
"The world will witness how the DPRK tames the U.S. gangsters by
taking series of action tougher than they have ever envisaged," the
North Korean Foreign Ministry said in a statement carried by the
official Korean Central News Agency, referring to the country by the
acronym of its official name, the Democratic People's Republic of
Korea.
----------
Asia-Pacific economic ministers admit no RCEP agreement by year-end

MANILA - Economic ministers from 16 Asia-Pacific countries
negotiating an alternative trade pact to the floundering
Trans-Pacific Partnership pact acknowledged Sunday no agreement will
be finalized by year-end.
Instead the economic ministers involved in negotiating the
Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership agreement -- covering
more than 3.5 billion people, or half the world's population, and 30
percent of global gross domestic product and trade -- said they will
strive to make major progress by November when the leaders of the 16
nations meet in Manila.
----------
Cambodia Daily owner asks Hun Sen to allow publication to resume

PHNOM PENH - The owner of The Cambodia Daily, an
English-language newspaper which ceased operation last Monday ahead
of a government threat to shut it for unpaid taxes, has asked Prime
Minister Hun Sen to allow it to resume publication.
Deborah Krisher-Steele, the owner of The Bernard Krisher Jimusho
Co., Ltd., publisher of The Cambodia Daily, wrote a letter to Hun Sen
on Saturday, seeking his help in resolving the tax dispute so that
the newspaper can resume operating and prevent more than 100 staff
from losing their jobs.
----------
Rescue, relief efforts continue in Mexico as quake death toll rises

JUCHITAN, Mexico - Rescue and relief efforts continued Sunday in
Mexico following the powerful earthquake that devastated the southern
region, with the death toll reportedly rising to at least 90.
In Oaxaca alone, one of the hardest-hit states, 71 people were
confirmed dead, according to local officials. In the town of Juchitan
in Oaxaca, around 5,000 houses were destroyed, with schools and
churches also sustaining serious damage.
----------
Rohingya insurgents declare month-long truce to allow aid delivery

YANGON/DHAKA - Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar's Rakhine
State declared a temporary ceasefire on Sunday and urged the
government to reciprocate to allow for humanitarian assistance to
reach vulnerable civilians trapped in the conflict zone.
The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, in an online statement,
declared a "temporary cessation of offensive military operations" for
a one-month period starting Sunday "in order to enable humanitarian
actors to assess and respond to the humanitarian crisis" there.

Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, Sept. 11 Kyodo

----------
Tokyo commuter train catches fire, 300 passengers evacuate on tracks

TOKYO - A commuter train caught fire Sunday afternoon in Tokyo
after being stopped next to a building along the tracks that was
ablaze, forcing some 300 passengers to evacuate.
No one was hurt in the incident that occurred on the Odakyu Line
operated by Odakyu Electric Railway Co. between Sangubashi and
Yoyogi-hachiman stations, but about 71,000 people were affected by
subsequent delays.
----------
Tokyo stocks open sharply higher after strong Japan machinery orders

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks opened sharply higher Monday following
better-than-expected Japanese machinery orders for July released
before the opening bell, while concerns eased somewhat after an
anticipated North Korean missile launch over the weekend did not
eventuate.
In the first 15 minutes of trading, the 225-issue Nikkei Stock
Average rose 219.36 points, or 1.14 percent, from Friday to
19,494.18. The broader Topix index of all First Section issues on the
Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 18.54 points, or 1.16 percent, to
1,612.08.
----------
N. Korea warns U.S. will pay "due price" over tighter U.N. sanctions

BEIJING - North Korea warned on Monday that the United States
will pay a "due price" and experience the "greatest pain and
suffering" if it pushes for new and tighter U.N. sanctions following
Pyongyang's most powerful nuclear test yet earlier in the month.
"The world will witness how the DPRK tames the U.S. gangsters by
taking series of action tougher than they have ever envisaged," the
North Korean Foreign Ministry said in a statement carried by the
official Korean Central News Agency, referring to the country by the
acronym of its official name, the Democratic People's Republic of
Korea.
----------
Dollar trades in lower 108 yen range in early Tokyo deals

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar traded in the lower 108 yen range early
Monday in Tokyo, up from its levels in New York late last week.
At 9 a.m., the dollar fetched 108.29-30 yen compared with
107.80-90 yen in New York and 107.74-75 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m. Friday.
----------
Japan's July machinery orders up 8.0% on month

TOKYO - Japan's core private-sector machinery orders increased
8.0 percent in July from the previous month to 853.3 billion yen, the
government said Monday.
The orders, which exclude those for ships and from utilities
because of their volatility, are widely viewed as an indicator of
future capital spending by companies.
----------
Asia-Pacific economic ministers admit no RCEP agreement by year-end

MANILA - Economic ministers from 16 Asia-Pacific countries
negotiating an alternative trade pact to the floundering
Trans-Pacific Partnership pact acknowledged Sunday no agreement will
be finalized by year-end.
Instead the economic ministers involved in negotiating the
Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership agreement -- covering
more than 3.5 billion people, or half the world's population, and 30
percent of global gross domestic product and trade -- said they will
strive to make major progress by November when the leaders of the 16
nations meet in Manila.
----------
Cambodia Daily owner asks Hun Sen to allow publication to resume

PHNOM PENH - The owner of The Cambodia Daily, an
English-language newspaper which ceased operation last Monday ahead
of a government threat to shut it for unpaid taxes, has asked Prime
Minister Hun Sen to allow it to resume publication.
Deborah Krisher-Steele, the owner of The Bernard Krisher Jimusho
Co., Ltd., publisher of The Cambodia Daily, wrote a letter to Hun Sen
on Saturday, seeking his help in resolving the tax dispute so that
the newspaper can resume operating and prevent more than 100 staff
from losing their jobs.
----------
Rescue, relief efforts continue in Mexico as quake death toll rises

JUCHITAN, Mexico - Rescue and relief efforts continued Sunday in
Mexico following the powerful earthquake that devastated the southern
region, with the death toll reportedly rising to at least 90.
In Oaxaca alone, one of the hardest-hit states, 71 people were
confirmed dead, according to local officials. In the town of Juchitan
in Oaxaca, around 5,000 houses were destroyed, with schools and
churches also sustaining serious damage.
----------
Rohingya insurgents declare month-long truce to allow aid delivery

YANGON/DHAKA - Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar's Rakhine
State declared a temporary ceasefire on Sunday and urged the
government to reciprocate to allow for humanitarian assistance to
reach vulnerable civilians trapped in the conflict zone.
The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, in an online statement,
declared a "temporary cessation of offensive military operations" for
a one-month period starting Sunday "in order to enable humanitarian
actors to assess and respond to the humanitarian crisis" there.
----------
N. Korea may possess nuclear weapons for war use: Japan minister

TOKYO - North Korea may now possess nuclear weapons that can be
used in an actual war, Japan's defense minister said Sunday following
the North's sixth nuclear test a week ago.
The nuclear test explosion "was 160 kilotons, 10 times the force
of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima" in 1945, Itsunori Onodera
told reporters. "I can't help but think the country possesses nuclear
weapons."
----------
N. Korean leader calls for stronger nuclear deterrence

BEIJING - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has attended a special
banquet for the scientists involved in what he called the "perfect
success" of a hydrogen bomb test a week ago and ordered them to
further help strengthen the country's nuclear deterrence, its
official media said Sunday.
At the event in Pyongyang, Kim instructed them to advance
"scientific researches for bolstering up the nuclear deterrence of
self-defense," according to the Korean Central News Agency.
It is unknown when the banquet was organized.
----------
Chinese major banks suspending N. Korean transactions

YANJI, China - Chinese state banks have started suspending
transactions through accounts held by North Koreans, making it nearly
impossible to do business between the two countries, sources familiar
with the situation said Saturday.
Kyodo News has confirmed that branch offices of at least three
major state banks -- the Bank of China, China Construction Bank and
Agricultural Bank of China -- in the northeastern border city of
Yanji have also banned North Koreans from opening accounts.